City of
Madison

District 1

Alder Barbara Harrington-McKinney

Alder Barbara Harrington-McKinney

Alder Barbara Harrington-McKinney

Contact Information

Home Address:

1209 Dayflower Drive
Madison , WI 53719

Council Office

Common Council Office:
210 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd
Room 417
Madison, WI 53703
Phone: (608) 266-4071
Fax: (608) 267-8669
WI Relay Service

Alder Harrington-McKinney’s Updates

High Point Park Neighborhood Meeting - TODAY

January 12, 2017 2:41 AM


EARLY VOTING BEGINS TODAY
Early voting for the spring primary election.
Early voting starts today,  February 1st! You can head to any Madison public library to cast your ballot for State Superintendent. #EarlyVoteMadsion. Vote to strengthening our public schools. 

NEIGHBORHOOD MEETING TODAY
Name:               High Point Park Neighborhood  Meeting 

Topic:               A Neighborhood meeting scheduled for residents to discuss with Park staff concerns over usage of High Point Park as a soccer field. 

Date:                Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Time:                6:30 pm

Location:          West Police District Community Room, 1710 McKenna Blvd

 

PARKS: Capital projects in District 1

Preliminary  been scheduled for 2017 and 2018.  The list is not final until the respective budgets are approved;
 
Waldorf Park
Master plan and design
2016
Waldorf Park
Path and half basketball court and playground
2017
Norman Clayton Park
Tennis Court Repair
2017
Elver Park
Cross-country ski trail improvements, improve access points to park
2017
Elver Park (Playfields)
Repave parking lot by ballfields
2018
Elver Park
Fully accessible playground near shelter

2018-2022 PARK AND OPEN SPACE PLAN
What do you love about Madison's parks and open spaces?  What would you like to change?  What would improve them for future generations?
 
The City of Madison Parks Division is looking for input from the community to guide the 2018-2022 Park and Open Space Plan Update!  Madison Parks is hosting five visioning sessions to help define community values that will guide this plan update.
 
THE COMMUNITY VISIONING SESSIONS.
 
Community Visioning Session #1
Tuesday, January 31, 2017
5:30 - 8:00 PM
Warner Park Community Recreation Center
1625 Northport Dr.
Madison, WI 53704
 
Community Visioning Session #2
Monday, February 6, 2017
5:30 - 8:00 PM
Whitehorse Middle School - Library Media Center
218 Schenk St.
Madison, WI 53714
 
Community Visioning Session #3
Monday, February 13, 2017
5:30 - 8:00 PM
The Village on Park - The Atrium Community Room
2300 S. Park St.
Madison, WI 53713
 
Community Visioning Session #4
Wednesday, March 1, 2017
5:30 - 8:00 PM
Alicia Ashman Library
733 N. High Point Rd.
Madison, WI 53717
 
Community Visioning Session #5
Thursday, March 23, 2017
5:30 - 8:00 PM
Central Library - Meeting Rooms 301 & 302
201 W. Mifflin St.

2500 People Attend Public Forum on Immigration 

Statement of Madison Mayor Paul Soglin 
Regarding Trump Administration

The City of Madison will not waver in its efforts to protect the rights of everyone within our jurisdiction, regardless of status, while maintaining the core values of the Madison Police Department.

The constitutional principle is very simple: we are not employees or agents of the federal government, particularly Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

We will not use our local police department as a tool to enforce federal immigration laws. The trust between our police department and the people we serve is more important than our violating the constitution and improperly detaining individuals. If we stop someone for a traffic violation or a misdemeanor, we have no right to compromise that person's freedom through detention without a lawful court order.

We will cooperate with immigration federal authorities when legal; that means complying with a constitutional detainer request, which is most likely to occur when a serious crime or felony occurs, such as an assault.

Nowhere in our agreements with the federal government - housing, transportation, health, economic development or public safety does it state that as a recipient of federal funds, that we agreed to illegally or unconstitutionally detain individuals. We will vigorously contest any attempt by the Trump Administration to deprive Madison of funding, especially when unconstitutionally coerced.

I want to assure all of our residents and visitors that public safety is our top priority and that means building and strengthening police community relations.
The Madison Police Department works hard to build and preserve trust with the communities it serves, which means everyone. Immigrants in our city must be able    to trust all city departments including the police department.
Denying federal funds to cities that aim to build trusting and supportive relations with immigrant communities is misguided, wrong, and unconstitutional.
Given the actions of President Trump, we are now all 'sanctuary' cities. Every city in this nation is now subject to yet to be determined standards for local law enforcement. We do not know if the Trump government will cross any constitutional standards in requiring local police departments to act in an unconstitutional manner but let us be clear:
The decisions related to how law enforcement agencies prioritize their resources, direct their workforce, and define the duties of their employees resides with us.
This includes the role of the Madison Police department in immigration enforcement. Effective policing cannot be achieved by forcing an unwanted role upon the police by threat of sanctions or withholding of federal funding.
I want to recognize that there is a conversation over the technicality of what constitutes a "sanctuary city."

This has been noted by the United States Conference of Mayors and by the American Immigration Council. Some argue that to truly be a sanctuary city there must be no compliance with the federal government, even when presented with a proper detainer, as in an instance where an individual has been apprehended for a felony. By that standard, we are not a sanctuary city. I note that many cities that call themselves sanctuary cities apply that standard as outlined in statements from New York, Los Angeles, and Seattle.
                                     
We will continue to operate as I have described which is consistent with the Statement of Sanctuary adopted by the Madison City Council on June 1, 2010. That statement, in part, states that the city will resist using local law enforcement to enforce federal immigration law because it engenders "an atmosphere of divisiveness, fear and mistrust that is unhealthy for our society, and especially harmful for a diverse community like Madison...instead of making the communities safer, these efforts have had the effect of alienating the immigrant communities and reducing cooperation with the police, creating fear, discouraging the reporting of crime, and victimizing victims."


  

City wide Community Forum and SEED Grant

January 27, 2017 1:13 AM

City wide Community Forum – "Know Your Rights" – United We Stand

A city-wide gathering to support our community's immigrant residents in the face of potential attacks by the current administration will be held on Sunday, January 29th (2PM-5 PM) at Monona Terrace Conference Center.

"Know Your Rights" United We Stand, organized by a committee of community leaders, Madison Alders led by myself and Jewish, Christian and Muslim faith leaders, will provide information on the legal rights of immigrants, the perspectives of local, state and national elected officials and how we can help each other in the difficult times ahead.

Speakers include Mayor Soglin, representatives of the Latino and Muslim civil rights organizations, the ACLU, community and faith leaders. The afternoon meeting will be moderated by Rev. Everett Mitchell, Dane County Judge and Pastor of Christ the Solid Rock Church.

The people who live under these repeated threats are not a far-away "population." They are your neighbors, your co-workers and the children that your children play with. However, with the current administration and all its executive orders already, our neighbors will not know whether their family members will be taken away or whether they will ever see their family members who live abroad again. These fears are validated by the repeated menacing comments and executive orders of the President and the men whom he is nominating for the highest offices.

________________________

Madison Food Policy Council Announces 2017 SEED Grant Cycle

The City of Madison Food Policy Council announces the 2017 SEED Grant cycle to address food access issues in our community. SEED Grants are small grants designed to support new and recently emerging projects or programs that support access to healthy food in our community.

The City of Madison 2017 Budget includes $50,000 in grant funds to be given out by the Madison Food Policy Council. The Madison Food Policy Council is encouraging any organization, group, or agency that is devoted to making food more accessible to apply. Any proposal that improves the local food system will be considered. The maximum of any one grant will be limited to $10,000.

In June of 2013, the United Way of Dane County, the Community Action Coalition of South Central Wisconsin, and the Goodman Foundation released a 10-year plan to increase access to fresh and healthy food for all children in Dane County. The Healthy Food for All Children 10-year Plan outlines many different strategies and objectives to accomplish this goal, including both short and long-term policies, programs, and actions. The Madison Food Policy Council is requesting that applications for the grant funding address one of the "short-term program programs/policies/actions" outlined in the plan that can be found HERE.

Those interested should go to the City of Madison website for the grant application guidelines and application form. Applications are due on Friday, February 24th, 2017 by 1:00pm, and should be submitted to George Reistad, Food Policy Director, at greistad@cityofmadison.com or mailed/hand-delivered to the Mayor's Office at 210 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. Room 403, Madison, WI 53703. Applications submitted via standard mail must be postmarked no later than Wednesday, Feb. 22nd, 2017. 

Potential applicants are strongly encouraged to attend a pre-submittal meeting to discuss the grant application and explore potential collaboration opportunities with other organizations in attendance. The pre-submission meeting will be held on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 at 6:00 pm at the Catholic Multicultural Center (located at 1862 Beld St., Madison, WI 53713).

Applications will be evaluated by a subcommittee of the Madison Food Policy Council in February 2017. Decisions will be announced in late March. Additional questions can be directed to the Mayor's Office, (608) 266-4611.

 

_______________________________

MAYOR SOGLIN'S PRESS CONFERENCE - Sanctuary City

Thursday, January 26, 2017 - 4:26pm

The City of Madison will not waver in its efforts to protect the rights of everyone within our jurisdiction, regardless of status, while maintaining the core values of the Madison Police Department.

The constitutional principle is very simple: we are not employees or agents of the federal government, particularly Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

We will not use our local police department as a tool to enforce federal immigration laws. The trust between our police department and the people we serve is more important than our violating the constitution and improperly detaining individuals. If we stop someone for a traffic violation or a misdemeanor, we have no right to compromise that person's freedom through detention without a lawful court order.

We will cooperate with immigration federal authorities when legal; that means complying with a constitutional detainer request, which is most likely to occur when a serious crime or felony occurs, such as an assault.

Nowhere in our agreements with the federal government - housing, transportation, health, economic development or public safety does it state that as a recipient of federal funds, that we agreed to illegally or unconstitutionally detain individuals. We will vigorously contest any attempt by the Trump Administration to deprive Madison of funding, especially when unconstitutionally coerced.

I want to assure all of our residents and visitors that public safety is our top priority and that means building and strengthening police community relations.
The Madison Police Department works hard to build and preserve trust with the communities it serves, which means everyone. Immigrants in our city must be able   to trust all city departments including the police department.
Denying federal funds to cities that aim to build trusting and supportive relations with immigrant communities is misguided, wrong, and unconstitutional.
Given the actions of President Trump, we are now all 'sanctuary' cities. Every city in this nation is now subject to yet to be determined standards for local law enforcement. We do not know if the Trump government will cross any constitutional standards in requiring local police departments to act in an unconstitutional manner but let us be clear:

The decisions related to how law enforcement agencies prioritize their resources, direct their workforce, and define the duties of their employees resides with us.
This includes the role of the Madison Police department in immigration enforcement. Effective policing cannot be achieved by forcing an unwanted role upon the police by threat of sanctions or withholding of federal funding.

I want to recognize that there is a conversation over the technicality of what constitutes a "sanctuary city."

This has been noted by the United States Conference of Mayors and by the American Immigration Council. Some argue that to truly be a sanctuary city there must be no compliance with the federal government, even when presented with a proper detainer, as in an instance where an individual has been apprehended for a felony. By that standard, we are not a sanctuary city. I note that many cities that call themselves sanctuary cities apply that standard as outlined in statements from New York, Los Angeles, and Seattle.
                                     
We will continue to operate as I have described which is consistent with the Statement of Sanctuary adopted by the Madison City Council on June 1, 2010. That statement, in part, states that the city will resist using local law enforcement to enforce federal immigration law because it engenders "an atmosphere of divisiveness, fear and mistrust that is unhealthy for our society, and especially harmful for a diverse community like Madison...instead of making the communities safer, these efforts have had the effect of alienating the immigrant communities and reducing cooperation with the police, creating fear, discouraging the reporting of crime, and victimizing victims."

Contacts: Katie Crawley, 608-266-4611

Agency: 
Civil Rights, Common Council, Mayor's Office, Police
Category: 
Live & Work

___________________________

January 25, 2017h

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For more information contact: Bryan Johnson 608-267-2626

Collections Incomplete on West Side of Madison

Collection of refuse and recycling on the west side of Madison was not fully completed on Wednesday due to today's weather.  

Residents on the west side of Madison in the Wednesday area that were not collected as scheduled today should have their carts to the curb again tomorrow, Thursday, January 25.  Additional crews will be assigned to refuse collection on Thursday to get caught up.  This will not impact other collection districts. The Wednesday collection district on the west side received more snow than other areas of Madison, plus this is a hilly section of the city, making it very difficult for collection trucks.  We were not able to keep crews on overtime for refuse and recycling collection since the personnel was needed for snow and ice operations throughout the city.

Since there will be a citywide plowing tonight, residents are reminded that they should not have their refuse or recycling carts in the curb line until after crews have plowed the street.  Plows needing to steer around collection carts leave swaths of road unplowed, which increases the amount of time needed to fully plow a street.    

For additional information regarding snow and ice operations, please visit the City of Madison Winter website at www.cityofmadison.com/winter, and for additional information regarding refuse and recycling, please visit the Streets Division website at www.cityofmadison.com/streets.

_____________________

January 25, 2017
Department of Public Works, Streets Division

Chris Kelley, Streets Superintendent

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For more information contact 

Bryan Johnson 608-267-2626

Madison Declares Snow Emergency

The City of Madison has declared a snow emergency. This means alternate side parking restrictions will be in effect in the downtown/isthmus snow emergency zone as well as the rest of the City of Madison.  This snow emergency will remain in effect until 7 a.m. on Friday, January 27. 

The Streets Division along with contractors will begin plowing all city streets this evening.  We expect plowing operations to start around 10pm on Thursday, January 26 and it will take 10 to 12 hours for all streets to be cleared.  Currently, Streets Division crews are maintaining the city salt routes and will remain on the salt routes until switching to plowing operations around 10pmwhen the snow is predicted to come to a close. The combined plow force of the Streets Division and contractors will be approximately 170 pieces of equipment.  

Madison residents are asked to remove all vehicles and trailers from the street if possible. Fewer obstacles in the road means crews the plowing operations will be safer, faster, and more complete.  

Parking on the Street Tonight (Wednesday 1/25 into early morning of Thursday 1/26)

All residents who must park on the street tonight (the evening of January 25 into early morning of January 26) need to have their vehicles on the EVEN house numbered side of the street between the hours of 1am and 7am.  Violations of the alternate side parking rules are punishable by a fine of $60 throughout the entire City of Madison.  Violators could also be towed.

Parking on the Street Tomorrow Night (Thursday 1/26 into the early morning of Friday 1/27)Vehicles parked on the tomorrow night (the evening of January 26 into early morning of January 27) should have their vehicles on the ODD house-numbered side of the street between the hours of 1am and 7am.  Violations of the alternate side parking rules are punishable by a fine of $60 throughout the entire City of Madison.  Violators could also be towed.

Other Parking Information

Residents are reminded that all daytime parking restrictions will be enforced.  That includes restrictions that ban parking on selected blocks in the Downtown/Isthmus area and on the near east and near west sides.  Parkers should pay attention to all parking signs.

Parking is available in the cashiered sections of city-owned ramps in the downtown area. During a declared Snow Emergency you can park for no charge at the City ramps from 9 p.m. until 7 a.m. If you enter before 9 p.m. or leave after 7 a.m. you are liable for any parking charges before 9 p.m. and from 7 a.m. until the time you leave. 

When parking in the ramps overnight, do not park on the top level so this area can be plowed. Be aware that vehicles stored in city ramps longer than 48 hours are subject to being ticketed and towed. Meters in lots and ramps are enforced 24 hours per day, 7 days a week.  Parking is also available at the Brittingham Park Shelter parking lot off of W. Washington Ave.

Why You Should Follow Alternate Side Parking

Following alternate side parking keeps the roads open, wide, and safe for all roadway users – cars, bikes, emergency vehicles, refuse/recycling collection, and so on.  During tonight's snow emergency, when you park on the EVEN side of the street as you should, that leaves an open lane of travel on the ODD side for the plows to push the snow all the way back to the curb.  And tomorrow night, when you park on the ODD as you should, that means plows can get to all the snow on the EVEN side that they could not the night before since of all the parked cars were there.

Heavy Snow and the Morning Commute

This snow is very heavy and wet.  We will work to plow all the residential streets during the overnight hours, which unfortunately mean driveway aprons will be filled with this hard-to-shovel snow.  Be sure to allow yourself extra time Thursday morning to clear a path through the snow so your Thursday morning commute will not be impacted.  Also, be sure to take extra care when shoveling your driveway and sidewalks due to how heavy this snow will be. While we hope to have the snow plowed from all City of Madison streets by the start of the Thursday commute, it is probable our crews will still be out plowing at that time.  Be sure to give our operators plenty of space as they work to make the roads safe. If you are on the roads during the plow operations, it is common to encounter temporary windrows blocking side streets as crews loop through neighborhoods plowing the snow back to the curb.   

In general, everyone is encouraged to make good choices when on the roads.  Plan on needing plenty of extra travel time to get to your destination. Drive slow. Brake early. Be cautious.     

Madison residents can get complete snow emergency information at www.cityofmadison.com/winter or by calling 261-9111.

_____________________

January 21, 2017,
Downtown Traffic Impacts--Women's March on Madison

A parade called "Women's March on Madison is planned for Saturday, January 21st in downtown Madison.  The parade will start at Library Mall, 728 State Street, at noon on Saturday.  Participants are then expected to march up State Street to the capitol. 

Although parade participants are required to stay on sidewalks and follow all traffic laws, a large crowd is expected, and Madison Police will close State Street cross streets as necessary to divert traffic around the parade if safety becomes an issue.  The capitol square streets may also need to be closed to traffic due to the size of the crowd.   

Traffic delays should be expected for those driving downtown on Saturday between noon and 3:00 p.m.--especially on Gorham Street and Johnson Street.    

If you have any questions, please direct them to the listed contact person.
 
Contacts: 
Tom Mohr, 608-267-8725, tmohr@cityofmadison.com

UPDATE ON BRYNE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INNOVATION GRANT

Saturday, January 21, 2017 
Breakfast 8:30 am
Presentation 9:30 am
Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 5701 Raymond Rd
Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Grant

Our Neighborhood--A Safe and Beautiful Place
Ideas for IMPROVING our Safety and Wellbeing
Purpose--To identify community-driven solutions to improve public safety and wellbeing.
What we Did--We held 11 community conversations with about 70 youth, homeowners, renters, landlords, police officers, and others concerned about neighborhood safety and wellbeing to discuss ways to improve neighborhood safety and wellbeing.
What we Learned: Five themes accounted for the majority of ideas for improving safety and wellbeing including, activities for youth and children, public safety, relationship building, and food related issues.
 
ACTIVITIES FOR YOUTH AND CHILDREN
Participants expressed a broad consensus on the need for more support of children and youth.
 
JOB AND CAREER--Participants would like to see ways to improve the employment prospects for youth and young adults in the neighborhood. Ideas ranged from job shadowing, bring employers into the community as partners, computer skills training, and exposure to diverse job and career opportunities.
EDUCATION AND ENRICHMENT--residents similarly see the need for educational and enrichment opportunities for youth and young adults. These include arts and theatre, programs to keep kids in school, GED programs, and tutoring for high school students.
RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES--Participants overwhelming identified the need for more recreational opportunities for youth and children. This included extending hours and increasing staff for MSCR. It also included creating new opportunities for older teens (e.g., a "teen club"). Youth identified the need for better play equipment in the park, a full size gym, and improvements in the vacant lot near the strip mall to play football.
 
PUBLIC SAFETY
POLICE-COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS--This theme was the most prominent under public safety. Residents and police officers expressed a need to find ways to improve their relationship and for officers to get to know the neighborhoods better, especially for patrol officers. Officers also suggested the need for incentives to stay in district. Residents and officers each suggested that long-term, stable neighborhood officers were needed. Residents would like input on the role of neighborhood officers. Officers and residents each suggested approaches to pro-active policing.
NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH--Neighborhood watches and "helping hand" were two public safety measures suggested by participants. Police and residents each identified the need to find ways to improve their relationships.
BUILT ENVIRONMENT-- A third set of ideas had to do with changes to the built environment, including more lights in the neighborhood (street and park) and sidewalks.
 
BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS
 
COMMUNITY MEETINGS--Participants consistently identified the need for community gatherings to bring people together ranging from meetings to discuss and work together to address challenges to in the neighborhood.
INTERGENERATIONAL ACTIVITIES--A third theme was intergenerational activities, including shared activities for youth and children of all ages; peer mentoring was a related theme.
 
FOOD
 
ACCESS TO HEALTHY FOOD--A number of residents suggested the need to improve access to healthy food. This included a mobile grocery store sponsored by Willy Street Co-op or another grocer, supporting a small "mom and pop" neighborhood store, the development of the Allied Food Co-op, and a Saturday market.
COOKING TOGETHER--A number of participants suggested that cookouts and more community meals would promote community cohesion.

COMMUNITY GARDENS--Youth and adult residents each felt that community gardens would improve safety and wellbeing, possibly in the vacant lot near the strip mall.

Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Grant
Fact Sheet on Improving Safety and Wellbeing

STAY INFORMED
Comprehensive Plan Update

Madison has changed a lot since our current Comprehensive Plan was adopted in 2006. The time has come to assess our progress, reevaluate issues, revisit goals, and clarify our path forward, so the City of Madison has embarked on an update to its Comprehensive Plan. The City has launched Imagine Madison, a public engagement campaign to gather the opinions of all Madisonians. Imagine Madison will discuss issues and identify goals and actions through the lenses of equity, health, sustainability, and adaptability. Please join in the conversation and participate in imagining our shared future. Visit www.imaginemadisonwi.com and follow the process on Facebook or on Twitter.

 field. 
________________

Plans
The City of Madison has a long tradition of community planning. The Planning Division continues this work by creating and implementing plans that guide private development and public investment and help to inform decisions made by city boards and commissions during the development review and approval process.

It all starts with the Comprehensive Plan. This plan establishes urban development strategies and policies to guide future growth and development in the community. The plan assesses existing conditions and trends, provides recommendations for the use and development of land, the extension and improvement of transportation services and infrastructure, the development of community facilities, the expansion of the City's economic base, the provision of housing, and the protection of natural resources.

Making a Mosaic The Comprehensive Plan is a long-range plan with broad recommendations for future land use and development. To enhance the Comprehensive Plan and provide further guidance to proposed land use changes, the Planning Division creates City-Wide Plans, Neighborhood Plans, Neighborhood Development Plans, Preservation Plans/Historic Districts and Special Area Plans that provide more detailed analysis of special topics or areas. These plans provide more pointed recommendations that result in the partnerships, regulatory tools and investments needed to implement the community's desired vision of sustainable growth. This structure



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