City of
Madison

District 6

Alder Marsha A. Rummel

Alder Marsha A. Rummel

Alder Marsha A. Rummel

Contact Information

Home Address:

1029 Spaight St # 6C
Madison , WI 53703

Council Office

Common Council Office:
210 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd
Room 417
Madison, WI 53703
Phone: (608) 266-4071
Fax: (608) 267-8669
WI Relay Service

Alder Rummel’s Updates

D6 Items of Interest Week of November 13, 2017

November 12, 2017 10:05 PM

Highlights: Monday is the first and possibly final day of 2018 budget deliberations. The hot issues are likely to be the proposed change to Public Market funding source and competing proposals for how much the matching funds for the federal COPS grant should be if we are awarded a federal grant to pay for part of the cost of 15 patrol officers over three years. There is an amendment to cut funds for a pilot for police body worn cameras. I've also highlighted some D6 amendments I have proposed including adding $343K in TID 37 (Union Corners) funds for the affordable housing project at 134 S Fair Oaks and $502K in TID 37 funds to add undergrounding of utilities for the Winnebago St reconstruction scheduled for 2018. There are also amendments about paratransit services, youth and adult employment programs, homeless services and the public health violence initiaitive and more. It could be a long night. Upcoming meetings are listed at the end

 

 

Monday November 13, 2017

Common Council 

5:30p room 201 CCB

https://madison.legistar.com/View.ashx?M=A&ID=521226&GUID=B00882F1-28F6-4358-90D1-25091FE4D4E5

 

Capital budget amendments - my highlights below

https://madison.legistar.com/View.ashx?M=F&ID=5552541&GUID=FB147E30-6173-4800-B48C-1EC89D1C98A3


3. Amendment #-3  Capital. Agency: Economic Development Division Project Name: TID 37: Stone House Development Project #: NEW 

Sponsors: Alder Rummel Co-Sponsor(s): Mayor Soglin  

 

Appropriate $343,000 in TIF supported GO Borrowing for a developer loan to Stone House Development, Inc. for Fair Oaks Apartments. The proposed development will include an 80-unit rental housing development with 68 units affordable to households with incomes at or below 30%, 50% or 60% of the County Median Income (CMI). Borrowing associated with the project will be repaid by future increment in TID 

 

Amount GO Borrowing 343,000 Other Funding 0 Total: $343,000.  Amendment Impact Debt Service $40,210 TOAH Impact $0.43 

 

Discussion Analysis The proposed developer loan will be funded by GO Borrowing, which will be paid back by future year increment in TID 37. This action will be followed with subsequent underwriting and a resolution with recommended loan amount being introduced at the following Common Council meeting on November 21, 2017. 

 

Final action will need to be taken at the December 5th Council meeting for the developer to meet the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority (WHEDA) application deadline of December 8, 2017. The annual estimated increment generated by TID 37 is $1,435,458, the district is projected to have a $2.0 million cash deficit at the close of 2018. The Executive Budget included two projects funded by TID 37 totaling $32,000. The Finance Committee, through adopting Amendment 9, transferred funding ($957,000) for the Winnebago Street reconstruction from GO Borrowing to TID 37 proceeds. With this action the Capital Budget, as amended by the Finance Committee, currently authorizes $989,000 for TID 37 funded projects. Two amendments proposed by Council (capital amendments 6 and 7) propose authorizing an additional $845,000 in GO Borrowing to be paid back by future increment within the District. If both actions are passed projects funded by TID 37 in 2018 will total $1.8 million. 

 

I am sponsoring this amendment to the budget to provide a developer loan for TIF for 134 S Fair Oaks (Fair Oaks Nursery site) for affordable housing. Stonehouse recently received Council authorization for up to $1.35M of City Affordable Housing Funds, the additional  TIF funding will improve their score in their WHEDA application. This is the first of two required actions. If this passes, a resolution and staff report on underwriting will be introduced for referral and acted upon on December 5th. The WHEDA application is due December 8, awards are expected in April.  For the last WHEDA application, the Council did not approve TIF funding based on concerns about air quality. 

 

The developer for 134 S Fair Oaks (the Kessenich site) recently contracted with a third party environmental engineering firm to do an air modeling study of the Madison Kipp stacks and found that the impact from small particulates was not a health risk. I appreciate the uncertainty about the DNR's oversight and data from Kipp that informed the third party study, but I believe that all the information we have, as reviewed by our Engineering and Public Health staff indicate both proposed dwelling units at 134 and 131 S Fair Oaks will not expose future residents to air quality hazards. 131 S Fair Oaks received unanimous vote at Plan Commission last week for the proposed mixed use development with market rate housing. 


4. Amendment #-4  Capital. Agency: Economic Development Division Project Name: Public Market Project #: 10069 Sponsors: Alder Ahrens Co-Sponsor(s): Alder Eskrich, Alder Bidar-Sielaff, Alder Carter, Alder Clear 

 

Reduce the local share funding by $3.0 million (transfer in from General Fund) and increase federal funding for the project by $3.0 million. The remaining local funds for the project cannot be accessed until the anticipated federal and private contributions totaling $8.75 million have been received. Reduce the transfer to capital budgeted in the General Fund by $3.0 million and increase General Fund share debt service by $3.0 million. 

 

GO Borrowing 0 Other Funding 0 Total: $0. Amendment Impact Debt Service $0 TOAH Impact $0.00 

 

Discussion Analysis The project was first included in the Capital Improvement Plan in 2008. The project, in its current form, has been included in the CIP since 2013. Starting in 2014, the CIP included funding for costs associated with the land acquisition, planning, design, site preparation and construction for a Madison Public Market. A business plan was authorized in 2013 and approved by Council in October of 2015. A project Implementation Strategy was subsequently completed and approved by Council in March of 2016. Currently the authorized expenditure items are: consultants for fundraising and tax credits, an architect for site planning and architectural design services, and a program to provide assistance to prospective public market small businesses. Current project costs are being funded through previous federal Urban Development Action Grant (UDAG) awards. The 2018 Executive CIP replaced $3.0 million of federal funds that did not have an identified source with local funding. This amendment returns the project's funding breakdown to be consistent with the CIP from prior years. If adopted, the funding split for the project will be as follows: Local: 33% Federal: 48% Private Contributions: 19% The amendment also updates the operating budget to reflect the reduced amount transferred from the General Fund to capital. Reducing the transfer to capital will increase the General Fund share of debt service by $3.0 million. This is consistent with MGO 4.17 that prohibits the use proceeds from the debt service for operating expenses. 

 

I oppose this amendment. I serve on the Public Market Development Committee and in 2017 we scaled up our efforts to complete this project in 2019 and meet all the expectations placed on it by prior council action. We initiated an innovative program called MarketReady providing mentoring and training for new entreprenuers to develop and refine their business plan with the goal of being ready to open a business in the Public Market.  Our vendor outreach resulted in a racially and ethnically diverse pool of applicants that is majority women. https://marketreadymadison.org/?  We hired a consultant to help us apply for New Market Tax credits, a federal program that incentivizes community development  investments and economic growth using tax credits that attracts private investment to eligible census tracks.  We worked with the property owner to create a site plan that could include the Public Market in a mixed use redevelopment of the Washington Plaza shopping center (FKA Fiore shopping center). We created a Public Market Foundation that will become the nonprofit operator and are developing a fundraising strategy to raise $2.5M.

 

In his 2018 Executive Capital budget, Mayor Soglin reduced federal funding sources for the Public Market by $3M in recognition of the uncertainty of the new administration in Washington. Instead, the Mayor proposes to use $3.05M from closing TID 32 and TID 27. I believe increasing the share of city funds for this project is a reasonable course of action given the changed conditions at the federal level. We should continue to apply for federal EDA grants. I believe this is a unique project that will help grow our local food economy and  create opportunities for new and existing businesses to provide fresh produce and culturally diverse food offerings in a public gathering space that if done correctly will become a community catalyst for all residents. 


5. Amendment #-5  Capital. Agency: Engineering-Major Streets Project Name: Reconstruction Streets-Winnebago Street Project #: 10226 Sponsors: Alder Rummel Co-Sponsor(s): Alder Verveer 

 

Appropriate $502,000 TIF supported GO Borrowing for the undergrounding of utilities on Winnebago Street from Sutherland Court to Linden Avenue in 2018. Borrowing associated with this project will be repaid by increment from TID 37. 

 

Amount GO Borrowing 502,000 Other Funding 0 Total: $502,000. Amendment Impact Debt Service $58,850 TOAH Impact $0.63 

 

Discussion Analysis The proposed amendment adds funding to include utility undergrounding in the project scope for the Winnebago Street reconstruction in 2018. Within the new project scope, the reconstruction of Winnebago Street will include undergrounding overhead utility wires from Sutherland Court to Linden Avenue and on Sutherland Court from Winnebago Street to the northwest end. If adopted, the total budget for the project will be $1,459,000. The annual estimated increment generated by TID 37 is $1,435,458, the district is projected to have a $2.0 million cash deficit at the close of 2018. The Executive Budget included two projects funded by TID 37 totaling $32,000. The Finance Committee, through adopting Amendment 9, transferred funding ($957,000) for the Winnebago Street reconstruction from GO Borrowing to TID 37 proceeds. With this action the Capital Budget, as amended by the Finance Committee, currently authorizes $989,000 for TID 37 funded projects. Two amendments proposed by Council propose authorizing an additional $845,000 in GO Borrowing to be paid back by future increment within the District. If both actions are passed projects funded by TID 37 in 2018 will total $1.8 million. ?

 

I am sponsoring an amendment to the budget to add funding to include utility undergrounding in the project scope for reconstruction in 2018 paid for by TID 37 (Union Corners) funds. This project meets the city funding policy for undergrounding utilities.


9. Amendment #-9  Capital. Agency: Police Department Project Name: Police Body Worn Camera Pilot Project #: New Sponsors: Alder Bidar-Sielaff Co-Sponsor(s): Alder DeMarb, Alder Eskrich, Alder Martin, Alder Kemble Amendment Amendment 

 

Remove $123,000 in GO Borrowing for approximately 47 body worn cameras, related equipment, training, and overtime for processing video and camera system maintenance. The project funds a one-year pilot program in the North District for patrol, Community Policing Team, and Traffic Enforcement Safety Team officers and Sergeants. 

 

Amount GO Borrowing -123,000 Other Funding 0 Total: -$123,000 Amendment Impact Debt Service -$14,419 TOAH Impact -$0.16 

 

Discussion Analysis In 2014, the Police Department was asked to provide a report to Council providing an overview of the use of body worn video cameras and the costs for a potential pilot program; the report was delivered in December 2014. As a result, a committee was formed to solicit community input on the subject. The committee did not recommend the use of body worn video cameras at that time. The committee's work lead to the development of an effort to study policies and procedures within the Police Department; this analysis has been carried out by an outside vendor. The final report is anticipated to be completed by the close of 2017. Prior to the acceptance of the aforementioned committee recommendations, the 2015 CIP included $75,000 for a potential body camera pilot. Following the committee recommendations this funding was canceled as part of the 2016 Capital Budget. Funding for the project was not included as part of the 2018 Executive Capital Improvement Plan. Amendment 19 adopted by the Finance Committee added $123,000 for a one-year body worn camera pilot program in one Police district. The Department estimates implementing the program citywide would cost approximately $1.0 million ($754,000 for equipment and $240,000 for 3 new positions to administer the program). Operating Impact Annual Impact: ($ -??) While there is no operating impact for the pilot program, scaling the program citywide would require 3 additional positions and ongoing software and maintenance costs. The estimated annual cost of implementing the program citywide is $250,000. 

 

I voted against adding the body worn camera pilot funds to the 2018 budget at Finance. The vote was tied and the Mayor broke the tie and voted to fund the cameras. I will support this amendment because I would like to read the recommendations of the outside vendor, the OIR Group, about body cameras before initiating a pilot. When the Council established the MPD Policy and Procedure Ad Hoc Review Committee, we asked them to make recommendations about body worn cameras. I want to respect that decision.

 

A recent randomized study of police officers in Washington DC raises questions about the effectiveness of body worn cameras 

file:///home/chronos/u-27fa23c51284fcbbc3d0fbb312150def5ed4b2fd/Downloads/TheLabDC_MPD_BWC_Working_Paper_10.20.17_.pdf

NPR covered the release of the study: https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/10/20/558832090/body-cam-study-shows-no-effect-on-police-use-of-force-or-citizen-complaints

 

According to local press reports, the recent change in WI state law will limit the access of video footage from body worn cameras. The Badger Herald reported: "A Republican bill introduced by the Wisconsin state Assembly would create requirements for law enforcement agencies on how they use body cameras and what body camera footage they can release. Under the bill introduced by Rep. Jesse Kremer, R-Kewaskum, body camera footage would remain confidential unless it shows death, injury, arrest or searches. If the footage was recorded in a location where the individual has a "reasonable expectation of privacy," such as a home, law enforcement would have to get written consent from victims, witnesses and owners of the location. The footage would have to be kept for a minimum of 120 days. After that, it would be able to be deleted." https://badgerherald.com/news/2017/10/24/legislation-would-set-state-policy-on-body-camera-footage/

While I believe there is a value to have a video record of incidents, especially in officer involved shootings. I think we need to understand how they would be used, the cost of outfitting officers with cameras, who should wear them and when, procedures for and cost of storage, and who has access to video materials, before we initiate a pilot. But the recent research calls into question whether body worn cameras make a discernable difference in changing the behavior of officers or victims and bystanders, at all.                                                           



Operating budget amendments - my highlights

https://madison.legistar.com/View.ashx?M=F&ID=5552606&GUID=1AFEE5EE-767E-47DB-82EC-6487EC608F20

 


2. Operating-2 Amendment   Increased Funding for Homeless Services Agency: Community Development Division Sponsors: Alder Rummel Co-Sponsor (s): Alder Verveer, Alder Baldeh 

 

Appropriate $90,000 from the General Fund for community agencies contracts to provide homeless programs and services. TOAH Impact $0.97 

 

Discussion Amendment Impact The 2018 Executive Operating Budget includes $769,869 for community agency contracts for homeless programs and services; of the total available funding $691,000 is funded by the General Fund. A proposed resolution (Legistar 49339) was adopted by the Finance Committee at its November 6th meeting authorizing the full allocation of available funding for 2018 as a result of an RFP process. These funds will be allocated across nine agencies to implement programs in the following areas: Prevent Homelessness, Support Persons & Families Experiencing Homelessness, and Ending Homelessness. The proposed amendment authorizes an additional $90,000 for homeless services. During the RFP process no formal "B" list was developed; however, CDD staff have identified three additional service providers that would provide additional and prioritized homeless services for a combined total of $90,000. If adopted, the CDBG Committee will offer recommendations to the Common Council regarding the allocation of these funds.?


3. Operating-3 Amendment  County Funding for Paratransit Services Agency: Metro Transit Sponsors: Alder Kemble Co-Sponsor (s): Alder Martin 

 

Appropriate $855,345 in County Revenue and contracted services for Paratransit service expenses anticipated to occur during the phased implementation of Family Care in 2018. 

 

Discussion Amendment Impact: The proposed amendment adds funding to continue Paratransit services at the current level through the first part of 2018. These funds will allow Metro Transit to continue Paratransit service at the current level phasing the transition to Managed Care Organizations for a portion of 2018. The Executive Budget assumed changes to the Paratransit service delivery model would be in place starting on January 1st. Upon completion of utilizing these funds, Paratransit services will be provided through a contract only basis and could include the following service level changes: 1.An increased ride fare from $3.25 to $4.00 2.Change the origin-to-destination service to curb-to-curb instead of door-to-door 3.Establish parameters for subscription service riders 4.Eliminate the leave attendant service option 5.Cash fare payment instead of ticket and billing option?


4. Operating-4 Amendment  Bus Stop Accessibility Study Agency: Metro Transit Sponsors: Alder Kemble Co-Sponsor (s): Alder Martin  

 

Appropriate $40,000 from the Metro Transit fund balance for a study to analyze the accessibility of Metro's bus stops for people with disabilities. 

 

Discussion Amendment Impact The proposed amendment appropriates $40,000 from Metro's fund balance to conduct a study of bus stop accessibility for people with disabilities in 2018. The study will be funded by one-time use of Metro Transit's fund balance. At the close of the 2016 fiscal year the Metro Transit fund position was reported at $2,626,705. The proposed study will analyze fixed route ride components for people with disabilities including travel patterns, inventory of existing bus stop features, and identifying potential accessibility improvements. In 2018, the State's Family Care program is being implemented which may cause some of the existing Paratransit service riders to use fixed route service. The goal of the proposed study is to provide potential bus stop improvements and enhancements to better accommodate riders with disabilities. After the study is complete, the results will be reviewed for implementation of recommended improvements. Metro has identified possible future funding sources for these potential improvements including FTA Transit Enhancement funds and the 2019 MPO locally-coordinated plan, none of the aforementioned funding alternatives have been formally secured. The cost of the potential improvements will not be known until completion of the study.


5. Operating-5 Amendment  Violence Prevention/Youth & Adult Employment Funding Agency: Multiple Sponsors: Alder Bidar-Sielaff Co-Sponsor (s): Alder Eskrich, Alder Hall, Alder Martin, Alder Phair 

 

Reduce funding for Violence Prevention in Public Health by $240,000. Increase funding for Youth and Adult Employment contracts in CDD by $150,000 (Youth: $50,000, Adult: $100,000). Upon adoption of a Violence Prevention comprehensive plan by Common Council the Council will consider an amendment to support implementation. 

 

 Discussion Amendment Impact The Executive Budget added $250,000 to the Public Health budget to implement violence prevention strategies pending Council approval of a comprehensive plan for the program. As proposed, this funding is fully funded by the General Fund, costs associated with the program are not shared with Dane County. The Executive Budget also assumes two existing positions will be reclassified to support the work of this program. Costs associated with these positions will be shared between Dane County and the City of Madison. If adopted, the Public Health will proceed with the planned reclassification of positions; the budget will include $10,000 for non-personnel costs associated with administering the initiative. 

 

The Executive Budget includes $1.23 million for community agency contracts for Youth and Adult Employment (Youth: $604,508, Adult: $629,080) in the Community Development Division. The Executive Budget increased funding for Youth Employment contracts by $100,000. If adopted, the total funding for these contracts will increase by an additional $150,000 to $1.38 million. An RFP is currently underway to award these funds. The total amount requested for both categories was $2.69 million ($1.46 million higher than the allocated in the Executive Budget). Recommendations associated with the increased funding would be offered by the Community Services Committee as part of the funding process currently underway and would be subject to Council approval. 

 

I have been supporting funding for a public health approach to Violence and Injury prevention since I learned about the model. I am struggling with this amendment. I support adding funds for youth and adult employment programs, one of the beneficiaries of additional funds could be Operation Fresh Start's Options program, which did not make the first round of funding. The two positions in public health will take months to get hired and onboarded based on our understanding of how the county hiring process works. In the meantime, the Mayor has initiated a Rapid Response team composed of city, county, District Attorney staff and nonprofits service providers that helped with emergency responses after incidents of gun violence last summer. That effort may not need $250K but I think they should have more than $10K and will see if there is a way to agree on a compromise.


9. Operating-9 Amendment  Increase City Match for COPS Grant Agency: Police Department Sponsors: Alder Skidmore Co-Sponsor (s): Alder Verveer, Alder McKinney, Alder King, Alder Ahrens, Alder Clear, Alder Phair 

 

Appropriate $400,000 to fully fund the City match for 15 Police Officer positions requested in a 2017 COPS Hiring grant application, should the grant be awarded. The proposed amendment reflects the local match for the requested grant; should the grant be awarded the Police Department's grant budget will be amended accordingly to reflect the full award. 

 

Discussion Amendment Impact Resolution RES-17-00536 adopted on June 20, 2017, authorized the Police Department to apply for and accept a 2017 COPS Hiring grant that would award the City $1,875,000 to hire 15 police officers expanding community policing efforts in patrol. If awarded the three-year grant requires a local match that increases each of year of the grant until the costs are fully absorbed by the General Fund. If awarded, the City will also need to fund one-time costs associated with hiring the officers that are not covered by the grant (e.g. additional vehicles and initial issue expenses). If adopted, this amendment will fully fund the City match for the anticipated grant ($338,440 in 2018) along with one-time costs ($411,560). The Executive Operating Budget includes $350,000 for the City match with the intent that should grant funding be awarded for all 15 officers, the Department would request that the hiring would be staggered over two years, the Department of Justice has agreed to staggered hiring in the past. 

 

See next item for comments.


10. Operating-10 Amendment  Transfer City Match for 2017 COPS Grant to Contingent Reserve Agency: Police Department Sponsors: Alder Kemble Co-Sponsor (s): Alder Rummel, Alder Hall, Alder Carter, Alder Baldeh 

 

Transfer $350,000 from the Police Department for the City's local match for a 2017 COPS Hiring Grant for 15 police officers to the Contingent Reserve. The Department has applied for the grant, however the U.S. Department of Justice has not announced the awards. 

 

Discussion Amendment Impact Resolution RES-17-00536 adopted on June 20, 2017, authorized the Madison Police Department (MPD) to apply for and accept a 2017 COPS Hiring grant that would award the City $1,875,000 to hire 15 police officers expanding community policing efforts in patrol. If awarded the three-year grant requires a local match that increases each year of the grant until the costs are fully absorbed by the General Fund. If awarded, the City will also need to fund one-time costs associated with hiring the officers that are not covered by the grant (e.g. additional vehicles and initial issue expenses). 

 

The Executive Operating Budget, as amended by the Finance Committee, includes $350,000 for the City match with the intent that should grant funding be awarded for all 15 officers, MPD would request that the hiring would be staggered over two years, the Department of Justice has agreed to staggered hiring in the past. 

 

In 2016 the City entered into a contract with OIR Group to conduct an independent review of policies and procedures within the Police Department. A portion of the analysis and recommendations will focus on staffing levels within the Police Department. Under the current timeline the final report will be submitted later this month with recommendations to the Policy and Procedure Review Ad Hoc Committee by mid-December. The proposed amendment transfers $350,000 from the Police Department budget to the Contingent Reserve, bringing the appropriation for the Contingent Reserve to $1,850,000. If the grant is awarded and the City chooses to accept the award, funds will need to be transferred from the Contingent Reserve subject to Council approval. At the time of accepting the grant the Common Council will determine the final City match and number of positions to be created. If the City is awarded the full grant request and choses to accept the grant in its entirety the City match would be $750,000; fully funding the match would require an additional $400,000 above what is proposed to be transferred into the Contingent Reserve.

 

I support moving $350K to the contingent reserve to await OIR Group report on Police Procedures and Policy. Or if Operating budget Amendment 9 passes, I would support amending Amendment 10 to transfer $750K to contingent reserve for the match for all 15 officers in one year, if we receive the COPs grant. We don't know if the consultant will make suggestions about reallocation of staffing resources that could address the pressures on patrol officers.

 


Tuesday November 14

Common Council

5:30p room 201 CCB

 

A second day of budget deliberations, if needed.

 



Upcoming Meetings

 

11/20/17   REGER PARK PLAYGROUND MEETING 6:30p Hawthorne Library

 

The City of Madison Parks Division will hold a workshop to discuss playground improvements to Reger Park. This is the first of two public meetings for the project. At this meeting, City staff will present the playground design process and seek input from area residents. This meeting will be held Monday, November 20 @ 6:30 pm Hawthorne Library, Community Room 2707 E. Washington Ave. Madison, WI You are invited to attend this meeting to provide comments or input on the proposed project. If you have questions or comments but are unable to attend the meeting, please contact Mike Sturm at (608) 267?4921 or at msturm@cityofmadison.com.?

 

12/4/2017  210 S Dickinson demolition and new co


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