Gateway Intersections

Description

East Gateway

In November, 2013, the Committee asked the Consultant Team to develop concepts that retain the lakeshore in its current location for the Wilson Street/Williamson Street and Blair Street/John Nolen Drive intersection. The Consultant Team presented the four alternatives to the Committee in December, 2013:

Alternative one:

  • Includes new Hancock Street/John Nolen Drive intersection
  • Pedestrian/bike supercrossing with two-way bike lanes and shared pedestrian lane
  • Pedestrian/bike landing pads on either sides of John Nolen Drive
  • Relocates boat ramp
  • Relocates access to Machinery Row approximately south of Hancock Street
  • Creates Wilson Street cul-de-sac with angled parking
  • Eliminates parking lot north of John Nolen Drive

East Gateway Alternative 1

 

Alternative two:

  • Includes new Hancock Street/John Nolen Drive intersection
  • Pedestrian/bike supercrossing with two-way bike lanes and shared pedestrian lane
  • Pedestrian/bike landing pads on either sides of John Nolen Drive
  • Retains boat ramp in current location
  • Retains current access to Machinery Row
  • Creates Wilson Street cul-de-sac with angled parking
  • Eliminates parking lot north of John Nolen Drive

East Gateway Alternative 2

Alternative three:

  • Includes new Hancock Street/John Nolen Drive intersection
  • Shifts access to Machinery Row west on John Nolen Drive
  • Reduces access to Williamson Street by eliminating left turn lane from Blair Street
  • Allows for grade-level pedestrian  crossing at Hancock Street intersection
  • Provides separate left turn lane from John Nolen Drive onto East Wilson Street
  • Moves bike path crossing Blair Street north of the intersection
  • Wilson Street becomes one-way from intersection to Hancock Street

East Gateway Alternative 3

Alternative four: 

  • Eliminates channelized right off John Nolen Drive onto Williamson Street
  • Retains all other elements of alternative three

 

East Gateway Alternative 4

West Gateway

In November, 2013, the Committee asked the Consultant Team to develop concepts that retain the lakeshore in its current location for the North Shore Drive/John Nolen Drive, Broom Street/John Nolen Drive, and Broom Street/Wilson Street intersections. The Consultant Team presented the following concepts to the Committee in December, 2013:

North Shore Drive/John Nolen Drive Intersection
• Pedestrian/bike supercrossing with two-way bike lanes and shared pedestrian lane
• Pedestrian/bike landing pads on either sides of John Nolen Drive
• Eliminates channelized right onto John Nolen Drive to accommodate supercrossing



North Shore and John Nolen Drives


Broom Street/John Nolen Drive Intersection

• Pedestrian/bike supercrossing with two-way bike lanes and shared pedestrian lane
• Pedestrian/bike landing pads on either sides of John Nolen Drive
• Cycle track with two-way bike lanes on the east side of Broom Street
• Sidewalk enhancements
• Eliminates channelized right onto Broom Street to accommodate supercrossing

Broom Street and John Nolen Drive

Broom Street/Wilson Street Intersection
• Eliminates channelized right onto Wilson Street to accommodate Broom Street cycle track
• Improves bike/pedestrian crossings
• Reduces Broom Street southbound left turn from two lanes to one lane to accommodate bike path

 

Broom and Wilson Streets 

 



Public Comments

Have a question or comment on this item? Use the Public Comment Form.
Posted: 01/23/2014
I am concerned about making Hancock Street into a direct access point for John C. Nolen. Traffic rules at intersections on Hancock are already insufficient to protect pedestrians. Increased traffic on this narrow one-way street will increase noise for residents and make travel more difficult than it already is for pedestrians.

City Staff Response:
Thank you for your input.
Posted: 01/23/2014
My comment was for the John Nolen Drive/Wilson/Williamson/Blair intersection. If you do end up "cul-de-sac"-ing Wilson for car traffic, make sure there is still a reasonable pedestrian route left in its place, and make sure crossing Blair can be done reasonably. This intersection and light are currently helpful walking east-west or west-east, so any changes made must make sure pedestrian access is still fluid and permeable.

City Staff Response:
Thank you for your input.
Posted: 01/23/2014
As a resident of the 100 S. block of Hancock St, I am concerned about adding a Hancock / John C. Nolen intersection. Won't the new intersection increase traffic on Hancock, a residential street, as drivers are lured away from more arterial roads like King Street, Wilson Street, and Blair Street? Hancock isn't designed for heavy traffic, and a lot of its residents live in ground-level and low-level dwellings facing the street, so the added noise from traffic would be a major annoyance, especially at night.

City Staff Response:
Thank you for your input.
Posted: 01/23/2014
I was wondering if you could clarify some things about Proposal 1.

Regarding access to machinery row: would pedestrian access be maintained on the corner of John Nolen and Willy St? also, would the only way to access Machinery Row by car be via Hancock St?

City Staff Response:
Bicycles and pedestrians would continue to be allowed to cross at the current intersection - - and one of the recommendations could be to move the Machinery Row entrance to the (new) intersection at Hancock, with a signalized intersection
Posted: 03/12/2014
All of the east gateway configurations are really disappointing. Creating a cul de sac is against city policy and should be a non-starter. The other options don't look like they'd help at all. The last option is the best of a sorry lot. None of these look like they'd meaningfully improve things for pedestrians or bicyclists.

City Staff Response:
Thank you for your input.
Posted: 03/14/2014
A few thoughts from tonight:

*the formalized / stepped landscape plan that was proposed on the associated with the hotel/ convention center proposal, is contrary to the tastes and values of madison cyclists/ east siders/ artisans/ nature lovers (look to back to olmsted/ wright) for more of an expansive green space/ naturalistic design. It causes further discontinuity of space / values / culture with 'downtown' and 'eastside' … this relates to the problem (harsh discontinuity of ped/ bike space)… that creates a 'gateway'…we don't need a 'gateway', we need the opposite of a gateway, we need continuity with the capitol area, and a blending of naturalistic/ lakeside trees/ green space, with the capitol area

*the proposal for a cul-de-sac at the east side of E. Wison st. / john nolen/ blair … takes away a basic kind of functionality…and we should question that move (cars, in small, slow numbers, should be able to make that route (as a slow street, connecting willy with the downtown, but serving the needs of cyclists/ pedestrians at much greater priority relative to traffic value (as compared with present)…in other words, it should simply be a slow street.

*the proposal with the cul-de sac doesn't solve the basic issue (an X pattern over the intersection, that is desired by cyclists/ pedestrians

*we should be thinking about how we're going to reduce traffic flow down east johnson while we're at it: *when you make these historically slow, small streets superhighways…that tends not to be the right answer for the people living in these neighborhoods.

*though we should be wary of solutions that overpass the 'gateway' intersection, leaving it an unhealthy, problematic, high traffic area, and simply elevating cyclists (displacing ourselves from the cause of the problem, in other words)… ***Still, I think it is practical that there would be a long ramp, starting as your coming down E. Wilson, and crossing over to the machinery row side of williamson (starts high, clears the train, gently slopes to williamson)… mid-way through that ramp, it would branch-off into a 'Y', giving users the option to circle from near where rubins furniture is located, back towards monona terrace / lakeshore path. That's all the elevated ramping we really need (on a budget)…no spirals need apply (the same on the other side of the terrace, *if we decide on elevated bike/ ped paths, just 'u' them out and back, don't spiral them.

*None of this addresses another key bike ped issue / getting from this side of the capitol, to the james madison park area, and further down the E. Johnson area by bike… (The john nolen problem doesn't end at this intersection, it then goes on to plague cyclist and ped/ crossability of E. washington (past all the newly planned re-development)…so we might as well be thinking about the type of bike/ ped/ land-bridge type network we're going to need to facilitate easier movement across a revitalized east washington, while we're at it (although I realize it is somewhat separate from john nolen / willy intersection…I hope you see what I mean about the traffic flow being divisive of these two sides of town…following a line from john nolen to east wash, obviously… (again, I don't think spiraled bridges are the problem)..I also don't think planning for more vehicle volume is the answer, as long term (more alternative tranportation will have to be coupled to provide better bike/ ped movement (all of which should take precedence over existing car infrastructure…if we want to do it right)

Final Answer: We should probably put in a roundabout with an outer bike/ ped lane tomorrow. (small fixes like cul-de-sacing E. wilson (though there were some other beneficial changes on that plan, like cyclists/ pedestrians not getting crushed by cars turning into the machinery row parking lot right before a blind turn for oncoming cyclists!)…

Philosophical Answer: Add more car lanes and parking lots, and we'll have more cars….prioritize cycling infrastructure and walkability, and we'll have more cyclists and pedestrians. (any solution should probably be fairly demanding of less auto traffic into the future, not more)



City Staff Response:
Thank you for your input.