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Madison Fire Department
Committed to recruiting and retaining a qualified, diverse, inclusive and safe fire workforce.

emergency management

Emergencies and disasters occur everywhere - even in the City of Madison.
Prepare Respond Recover Rebuild

The City of Madison Fire Department is the lead agency for the City's Emergency Management initiatives to increase and improve the community's readiness for disaster.

The Emergency Management Staff Team works to plan and develop strategies to ensure individual residents and the City as a whole are prepared for events that may require emergency response and/or evacuation. The Team includes: public works agencies, emergency services, County Emergency Management, Mayor's Office and other related city agencies.

The team's activities are facilitated by the City's Emergency Management Coordinator, Ed Ruckriegel. The team sets priorities, works on plans, etc.

As part of the City's strategy, resources (personnel, equipment, and materials) are identified throughout Madison and surrounding communities.

Emergency Management All plans focus on disasters and emergencies most likely to occur within the South Central Wisconsin region.

Plans have been developed for special populations, whether sheltering in place or evacuating.

Community education is an important part of emergency preparedness. The City of Madison's Office of Emergency Management recommendations include these components:

Emergency Management

An emergency supplies kit

  • This should include items you would most likely need during an evacuation or extended emergency: water, food, first aid supplies, tools, extra clothing, and any items specific to your circumstances (medication, pet supplies, etc.)
  • Keep the items in an easy-to-carry, moisture-resistant container.


Emergency Management

A communication plan

  • Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so it is important to plan in advance: how you will contact one another; how you will get back together; and what you will do in different situations.
  • Identify an out-of town contact. It may be easier to make a long-distance phone call than to call across town, so an out-of-town contact may be in a better position to communicate among separated family members.
  • Be sure every member of your family knows the phone number and has a cell phone, coins, or a prepaid phone card to call the emergency contact.