Monroe Street Reconstruction Includes Robust Public Art Initiative

Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 2:04pm

Open House & Mosaic Art Input Session Scheduled for Wednesday, November 8, 6pm at HotelRED

Planning for the 2018 reconstruction of Monroe Street is nearing completion. The reconstruction plan includes a robust public art component developed by the City, consultants Ken Saiki Design and Urban Assets, and community artist Marcia Yapp.

An open house to unveil final landscape design plans for the Monroe Street entrance to Wingra Park and the plaza at the intersection of Monroe Street and Regent Street will be held on Wednesday, November 8, 2017 from 6:00-7:30pm at HotelRED, 1501 Monroe Street. The open house will be accompanied by a mosaic art input session to brainstorm ideas for new mosaic panels at both locations. A brief orientation presentation will begin at 6:00pm.

The two major mosaic works will be integrated into panels at the entryway of Wingra Park and along the Southwest Commuter Path as it parallels Regent Street between Breese Terrace and Monroe Street. The artist, Marcia Yapp, has extensive experience working with residents to create intricate mosaic murals that are reflective of the values, symbols, and aesthetics of the communities where they are sited. She will be gathering ideas from the public at the mosaic art input session. Community members interested in providing input on the character and content of the future mosaic art are encouraged to attend.

Additionally, the City anticipates that five artists will have their artwork displayed on wrapped traffic signal boxes to be installed during the street reconstruction. The works include: Monroe & Regent Streets - Michael Velliquette’s “What We Are Looking For is What is Looking,” Monroe & Spooner Streets - Sandra Klingbeil’s “Make Some Music,” Monroe Street & Edgewood College Drive - Nate Koehler’s “Humble Living,” Monroe & Glenway Streets - Paul McMahon’s “Up, Up and Away,” and Monroe Street & Commonwealth Ave - Helen Klebesadel’s “Prairie Grasses.” Images of selected works by those artists will be on display in the HotelRED lobby during the open house.
Monroe Street will also gain two sculptural works. “Anchorlily,” by William Turnbull (funded by the Madison Arts Commission), will be placed atop a pillar and nestled within a raingarden at the Monroe Street entrance to Wingra Park. “Badger,” by Harry Whitehorse, will be placed in the triangle-shaped plaza formed by Monroe Street, Regent Street, and Breese Terrace, across from Camp Randall Stadium.

“Badger” was conceptualized as a family-friendly work and intended to engage people of all ages; it sits at eye-level with young children, will be cast in durable bronze, and will be secured on a rubberized surface for safer interaction. While the mold for “Badger” has been created, $90,000 is still needed to cast, transport, install, and create a maintenance endowment for the work’s future care. More information about contributing to the fundraising effort will be available at the open house on November 8, or by contacting Karin Wolf, the City’s Arts Program Administrator (kwolf@cityofmadison.com).

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Tags: 
Monroe Street Reconstruction, Public Art, Art, Madison Arts Commission