Pot of Oil Left on Stove Caused $40,000 in Damage

May 26, 2014

An east side home suffered $40,000 in damage after a pot of oil was left on the stove.

Public Safety Communications Center received a 911 call around 2:17 pm, for the report of a fire at a single family home at 3425 Richard Street.

As City of Madison Fire crews arrived, they noticed smoke coming from a front window. Firefighters pulled an 1 ¾” hose line into the home and encountered heavy smoke. They saw fire around the stove and kitchen cabinets and extinguished the fire within two minutes.

It was found that a resident put a pot of oil on the stove, left the kitchen for a short time to close windows to a vehicle and garage as a storm came through. When he returned, he heard smoke alarms sounding, found the kitchen full of smoke and noticed fire on top of the stove. He called 911 to report the fire. The 911 call taker told him not to enter the home, but he would not listen to the dispatcher. He placed a towel over his head and entered the home, opened several windows and attempted to retrieve three cats. He re-entered the home again, grabbed a fire extinguisher and attempted to put the fire out. He finally went outside.

As City of Madison Fire crews arrived, they noticed smoke coming from a front window. Firefighters pulled an 1 ¾” hose line into the home and encountered heavy smoke. They saw fire around the stove and kitchen cabinets and extinguished the flames within two minutes. Firefighters removed the three cats from the home. One cat was taken to a veterinarian by private vehicle.
Fire damage is estimated at $25,000 and contents at $15,000. No injuries were reported at the scene.

Two adults who live in the home will stay with relatives.

City of Madison Firefighters Remind Residents:
When cooking, always have a lid close by and never leave the kitchen. When cooking with oil, use a sturdy pot with thick walls and do not reuse the oil. Reusing oil causes it to become unstable and flammable. Always use fresh oil.
Click on the link below to download a Cooking Safety flyer provided by the National Fire Protection Association.
http://www.nfpa.org/~/media/Files/Safety%20information/Safety%20tip%20sheets/cookingsafety.pdf

Contact: