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Madison Landmarks

#1: Bradley House
106 N. Prospect Avenue
1909
Sullivan and Elmslie, Architects

The Bradley house is one of the masterpieces of Prairie School design and is among Madison's most important architectural landmarks. The house was a present from Chicago plumbing magnate Charles Crane to his daughter Josephine and her husband Harold C. Bradley, a professor of chemistry at the UW. It is one of only a few residences designed in the office of Chicago architect Louis Sullivan, one of the greatest architects of all time. George Elmslie executed much of the design, which incorporated daringly cantilevered sleeping porches, raked brick joints, banded leaded glass windows, widely flaring eaves and beautiful Sullivanesque ornament. Severely damaged by fire in 1972, the house was restored by the Sigma Phi Society, its residents since 1914.

Designated May 18, 1971
National Historic Landmark
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#2: Pierce House
424 N. Pinckney Street
1857-1858
August Kutzbock, architect

Built in the early Romanesque Revival style, this Prairie du Chien sandstone house exemplifies the ornate designs of local architect August Kutzbock. It was designed for Alexander A.. McDonnell, contractor for the east wing of the State Capitol, which was being constructed at the
same time, also in the unusual Romanesque Revival style. Among later occupants of the house were John Garnhart, a plow manufacturer, and his wife Roberta, who after husband's death continued to live in the house and eventually married Orasmus Cole, chief justice of the Wisconsin Supreme Court; Sarah Fairchild Dean Conover, a noted society leader; and Carrie and George Pierce, a power company executive.

Designated May 18, 1971
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#3:  Keenan House
28 E. Gilman Street
1857
August Kutzbock, architect

Originally built in the early Romanesque Revival style, this house was altered in 1870 by the addition of a Mansard roof. The Milwaukee cream brick structure was built for, but never occupied by, Napoleon Bonaparte Van Slyke, first cashier of the Dane County Bank. It is said that he changed his mind about living in the house when Laura, his first wife, died. The house was sold to James Richardson, a business partner of Van Slyke and one of Madison's early business leaders, and next the owner was James Robbins, miller at the Yahara River flour mill. Chauncey Williams, another entrepreneur from New York state, added the "French" roof in 1870. Dr. George Keenan, prominent Madison surgeon, lived in the house with his wife, Mary, from 1900-1916.

Designated June 15, 1971
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#4:  Smith house
5301 Milwaukee Street
1855

Built of sandstone and cap limestone from a nearby quarry, this residence is an example of the Greek Revival style. The building was constructed as a farmhouse, but it is said that it also served as a halfway house for travelers between Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien. In 1848, Alexander Smith bought this land and built this house in 1855. The house remained in the same family until 1920.

Designated November 2, 1971
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#5: Gilmore House
120 Ely Place
1908
Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect

The only Frank Lloyd Wright design built in Madison during his Prairie School years, is this internationally-famous house built for Prof. Eugene A.. Gilmore and his wife in 1908. The site, located at the highest point in University Heights, offered Wright a magnificent opportunity. He positioned the house just below the crown of the hill and placed the principal living rooms on the second floor, providing the Gilmores with unrivalled panoramic views of Madison and the surrounding Four Lakes region. Copper-roofed wings extend outward from the forward-facing center pavilion with its triangular balcony. The resulting composition soon earned the building the local nickname of"the airplane house."

Eugene A.. Gilmore came to Madison with his family from Boston in 1902, having left his private law practice to join the University of Wisconsin law faculty. He quickly earned a national reputation as an educator and administrator. In 1922 he was appointed Vice-Governor of the Philippine Islands. In 1930 he returned to the U.S. to become the law school dean and later president of Iowa State University.

Designated January 17, 1972
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#6: Beecroft House
514 N. Carroll Street
1911

This elegant house was built for Madison dentist William Beecroft and his wife Lucy. Dr. Beecroft was known in Madison as "Mr. Theater" because of his activities in developing moving theaters, included the Strand and the Orpheum. The house is a fine example of the Prairie style, with banded leaded glass casement windows and wide eaves. Because of similarities to other known Claude and Starck works, it seems probable that Claude and Starck designed this house.

Designated January 17, 1972
Landmark Nomination Form


#7: Old Governors' Mansion
130 E. Gilman Street
1856

Constructed of locally quarried sandstone and designed in the Italianate style, this house was originally built for Catherine and Julius T. White, Secretary of the Wisconsin Insurance Company. The Whites sold the house in 1857 to one of Madison's first settlers, George P. Delaplaine
and his wife, Emily. Delaplaine was secretary to Governors Farwell and Dewey and co-owner of one of the largest real estate development firms in the city. In 1867 the house rose to greater social prominence when it was purchased by State Senator J. G. Thorp, a millionaire lumber baron, and his wife, Amelia. In 1870, the Thorp's young daughter, Sarah, married Ole Bull, the world-famous 60-year-old Norwegian violinist in one of the most lavish weddings the town had ever seen. Governor Jeremiah Rusk acquired the house in 1883 and sold it to the State of
Wisconsin two years later. Conover and Porter designed renovations in 1897 which including a sweeping wrap-around veranda with Ionic columns, which was drastically reduced in size in the 1960s. The house served as the executive mansion for seventeen governors from 1885 to 1950.

Designated January 17, 1972
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#8: Bashford House
423 N. Pinckney Street
1855

This house is an example of the Italian Villa style executed in sandstone. Its square, hipped roof, three-story tower, or campanile, is unique among old Madison residences. The house was first occupied by H. K. Lawrence, banker and secretary of the Madison and Watertown Railroad. From 1865 to 1915 the house was owned by Morris and Anna Fuller. Morris Fuller was a distributor of agricultural implements, a business that was to become one of the mainstays of the Madison economy. The Fullers' daughter, Sarah, married lawyer and politician Robert Bashford and they lived in the house together from 1889 until 1911. August Kutzbock is known to have done some of the drawings for finishing the house, and it is probable that he also drew the original design.

Designated January 31, 1972
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#9:  Van Slyke House
510 N. Carroll Street
1856-1858
August Kutzbock, architect

Originally built for Samuel Fox, a successful hardware merchant, the house was soon sold to Napoleon Bonaparte Van Slyke and his second wife Annie. One of the most important players in the development of Madison, Van Slyke came to Madison from New York state in 1853 and helped form the first abstract and title company and one of the first banks. He was also one of the first regents of the UW, serving for over 30 years, and was quartermaster for Camp Randall during the Civil War. He lived in this house for forty-nine years.

The house is a refined and skillfully detailed example of the Italianate style that can compete in excellence, if not necessarily size, with the best Italianate style houses in the country. The stonework is also rare and beautiful. It is done in a form of stone laying known as "block and
stack" in which large blocks are alternated with smaller stones and then the whole wall is covered in raised mortar joints to highlight the variation in stone sizes. This is a Germanic technique that may be unique in the United States to the Dane County-Sauk County area.

Designated January 31, 1972
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#10: Kendall House
104 E. Gilman Street
1855
August Kutzbock, architect

John E. Kendall from New York built this sandstone home in 1855, the first of the four houses at the corner of Pinckney and Gilman; but he sold it soon after construction and it is not clear which of several early owners may have actually lived in the house. In the late 1860s, at the height of Madison's resort era, this mansion was used as a summer home by the St. Louis family of D. R. Garrison, president of the Southern Pacific Railroad. The house was originally styled by August
Kutzbock in the Italianate mode, with a low, hipped roof and a cupola. However, in 1873 a Mansard roof was added to adapt it to the more modern French Second Empire style.

Early in the 20th century, the house was graced by a frame porch across the entire front of the first floor. Ironwork with spiked finials danced along the roof line. Although not as elegant appearing as when constructed, the Kendall House remains a focal point on Mansion Hill.

Designated January 31, 1972
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#11: Keyes House
102 E. Gorham Street
1853

This brick Italianate style house was originally built for Lansing W. Hoyt, a local land speculator, and his wife Melvina in 1853. It was later occupied Elizabeth and Elisha W. Keyes, a powerful state and local political "boss" who was appointed postmaster by Abraham Lincoln in 1861. In the 19th century postmasters wielded a great deal of political power because they controlled many jobs that they could give to political
supporters. Keyes was elected Mayor of Madison in 1865 and again in 1866 and 1886. In the Progressive era, "Fighting Bob" La Follette made Keyes the symbol, somewhat undeservedly, of the political corruption of big business.

The original front yard of this house has been preserved as Period Garden Park. Area residents campaigned successfully to protect this open space after plans to build a large apartment house on the site were announced.

Designated January 31, 1972
Landmark Nomination Form


#12: Brown House
116 E. Gorham Street
1863

This cream brick house is in the Italianate style. The stately neo-classical veranda dates to the turn-of-the-last-century. Timothy Brown came to Madison in 1855 at the request of a fellow New York Stater, Napoleon Bonaparte Van Slyke, to be part of a growing Yankee contingent on Mansion Hill. Brown quickly became cashier and principal stockholder of the Dane County Bank. With others, he reorganized it into the First National Bank in 1863 (which has evolved into the present U S Bank). In 1870 Brown took control of the floundering Madison Gas Company and turned it into a financially sound business. Brown's real estate holdings and business investments made him a well-known commercial figure and one of Madison's wealthiest people. In civic affairs, he served as treasurer of the UW Board of Regents, alderman, county supervisor, and leader of the Dane County Cavalry during the Civil War. His wife, Elizabeth, continued to live in the house until her death in 1896. Mrs. Brown's house became the center of a family compound, as sons built their own houses near-by.

Later residents of the Brown family homestead included three justices of the state supreme court, a law partner of Robert M. La Follette, and grandson Timothy Brown. The original rambling carriage house is just east of the house.

Designated March 6, 1972
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#13: Stevens House
401 N. Carroll Street
1863

This stately Italianate house was built for Daniel and Mary Jane Tenney. Tenney came to Madison in 1850 to typeset for his brother's newspaper, the Argus. Tenney then went to law school, his family moved to Chicago in 1870 and returned to Madison in 1897, where, among many civic activities, he gave the funds to develop Tenney Park. In 1870 Breese Stevens purchased the house and it remained in the family for about 100 years. Another prominent lawyer, Stevens had extensive business interests, served as mayor for two terms, and as UW regent for many years. His wife, M. Elizabeth Stevens, was one of the founders of the Madison Woman's Club.

Designated March 6, 1972
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#14: St. Patrick's Church
404 E. Main Street
1888-1889
John Nader, Architect

Designed in the Romanesque Revival style, this church was designed by local architect and civil engineer, John Nader, known at the time as Madison's grandfather of architecture. It was the third Roman Catholic Church building to be erected in downtown Madison, the others being St. Raphael's and Holy Redeemer. As one might guess from the name, the church was attended by many of the Irish Catholic families in the city.

Designated March 6, 1972
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#15: Mears House
420 N. Carroll Street
1870-1871

This lovely Italianate house was built for James and Lois Mears. Mears was a civil engineer who came to Madison from New York state in 1852. In Madison he took up the dry goods business, later changing to lumber. In the Civil War he served as an Army paymaster. The house features characteristic Italianate details, including doubled brackets under the eaves, a shallowly pitched hip roof brick corner pilasters, a row of brick dentils (teeth) under the cornice and carved stone lintels. The classical porch dates to the early 20th century.

Designated March 6, 1972
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#16: Old Spring Tavern
3706 Nakoma Road
1854

The Spring Tavern is the oldest building in Nakoma and one of the oldest in Madison. It was built by Charles Morgan, a native of Connecticut who came to the western frontier to improve his health. From 1860 to 1895, the Gorham family used the building as an inn, serving travelers journeying between Milwaukee and Platteville on the historic road of which Nakoma Road is now a part. The Tavern sits on a large, steeply sloping lot. Its most visible facade, the one with the two-story veranda added in the 1920s, faces east toward Nakoma Road, but the Council Crest side is the original front of the house. This fine example of the Greek Revival style is built of brick made from clay dug from the slope behind the house and fired in a kiln that Morgan erected near the Duck Pond just across Nakoma Road. Typical Greek Revival features include returned eaves, multi-light double-hung windows, and a main door enframed with side lights and a transom light above.

Designated March 20, 1972
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#17: Bowen House
302 S. Mills Street
1855

This Italianate farmhouse was built on a 60-acre parcel for Seth and Harriet Van Bergen in 1855. Both Van Bergens were early pioneers. Harriet settled with her family in Jefferson County in 1838 and Seth arrived in Madison in 1842. Four years after they moved into their stone farmhouse, the Van Bergens sold the farm to Dr. James and Susan Bowen. Dr. Bowen was the first homeopathic physician in Madison, founded a leading Madison bank, and served as Madison's mayor in 1871. He died in 1881 and his daughter, Susan, and her husband, Wayne Ramsey, moved into the farmhouse. The house remained in the family until 1923. During the time the Ramseys owned the house, new housing developments sprang up all around the farm and soon they had sold off all but the immediate surrounding lot. The family donated the land for St. James Roman Catholic Church, which was named in Dr. James Bowen's honor.

Designated April 17, 1972
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#18: Stoner House
321 S. Hamilton St.
1855
This Italianate house, built of our local sandstone, was constructed in 1858 for Henry and Janet Staines. The Staines family were Scottish immigrants who first settled in Sauk County and later moved back there. In 1863 the house was briefly owned by a butcher Robert and Christina Nichols. In 1865 the house was sold to Joseph J. and Harriet Stoner, who lived there for two decades. Joseph Stoner had an interesting occupation - he published birds'-eye views of cities all over the country, views which now are significant records of the history of our nation in the 19th century. In 1884 the Stoners retired and lived on a farm outside of Madison, moving to California in 1902. Joseph Stoner died in 1917. The next owners were plumber Thomas and Susan Regan.

From 1922 to 1957, Varley and Ellen Bond owned the house and undertook significant renovations, but afterward it was used as offices until it fell into such disrepair that it stood vacant and deteriorating for over a decade. In 1983 the Wisconsin Architects Foundation received the building and moved it to the corner of the block to make way for a condominium project. The Foundation undertook a major restoration of the building and have had their offices there since.

Designated April 17, 1972
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#19: Leitch House
752 E. Gorham Street
1857-1858

The superb William and Jane Leitch house is one of Madison's most important nineteenth century buildings and our best example of the mid-19th century Gothic revival style. William Leitch was born in England, came to New York in 1829 and moved to Madison in 1858, having written ahead to get construction started on his family's new house. Madison sandstone was used for the walls, slates covered the roof and woodwork was carved in lacy medieval designs. The house cost almost $14,000 to build, in a day when a good frame house could be built for $500.

Leitch, a merchant, was elected Mayor of Madison in 1862, 1863 and 1864. The next owners were Carolyn and M. Ransom Doyon, Doyon serving as Mayor in 1888 and 1889. The Doyons were followed by Bella and Nils Haugen, a lawyer and prominent figure in the progressive movement.

Designated April 17, 1972
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#20: Ely House
205 N. Prospect Avenue
1896
Charles Sumner Frost, architects

Designed by regionally important architect, Charles Frost of Chicago, the Richard and Anna Ely house is an elegant late Victorian version of the Georgian Revival. The Georgian Revival had been popular on the east coast for some time, but this is one of the first to be built in Madison. This house follows the general design of the 1759 Longfellow house in Cambridge, Massachusetts, but embellished with Victorian details. Professor Ely was a nationally known economist whose progressive, socialist teachings, caused him to be tried in 1894 by the Board of Regents in a famous formal inquiry which resulted in Ely's vindication and in the declaration of academic freedom: "whatever may be the limitations which trammel inquiry elsewhere, we believe that the great state University of Wisconsin should ever encourage that continued and fearless sifting and winnowing by which alone the truth can be found."

Designated January 7, 1974
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#21: Morehouse House
101 Ely Place
1937
George Fred Keck, architect

The Edward and Anna Morehouse house is an excellent example of a major work by an important regional architect, George Fred Keck of Chicago, in a very rare style for Midwestern domestic architecture, that of the true International style. Salient characteristics of this style are flat roofs, smooth wall surfaces and windows with minimal exterior reveals, appearing to be a continuation of the surface. There is also a balance of parts to be found instead of one-part axial symmetry, and windows are used in vertical or horizontal ribbons, frequently turning the corner. Keck was one of the first architects to seriously address passive solar design and he was the architect for the 1933 Chicago World's Fair "House of Tomorrow."

Designated January 7, 1974
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#22: Buell House
115 Ely Place
1894
Conover and Porter, Architects

When prominent Madison attorney and real estate developer, Charles E. Buell and his wife, Martha, built this imposing house for their family in 1894, it was the first one built on the crown of University Heights. The house was quickly dubbed "Buell's Folly" by local wags and the earliest pictures of the Heights, taken from Bascom Hill, show why. The house sat in solitary but highly conspicuous grandeur on a naked hillside outside of town in a location which did not seem to bode well for the future. It was Buell, however, who had the last laugh. When he died in 1938, his fine home was completely surrounded by the homes of Madison's elite, many of which rested on lots sold by Buell himself.

Buell's house was designed by the prominent local firm of Conover and Porter, and is a fine example of the late Queen Anne style deeply influenced by shingle style examples. Conover and Porter and best remembered today for their castle-like "Old Red Gym" and Science Hall on the UW campus.

Designated January 7, 1974
Landmark Nomination Form


#23: Gates of Heaven Synagogue
300 E. Gorham Street
1863
August Kutzbock, architect

Noted Madison architect, August Kutzbock, who was trained in Germany, designed this little gem of a building. He also used this distinctive Germanic style for the Pierce and Keenan Houses at Pinckney and Gilman Streets. Gates of Heaven (Shaare Shomain in Hebrew) was built in 1863 on W. Washington Avenue for Madison's first Jewish congregation. The building later served as the first Unitarian Society Meeting House, the Women's Christian Temperance Union, the First Church of Christ, Scientist, the English Lutheran Church and a funeral home. It was moved to this site in 1971 through the efforts of local citizens and the City of Madison to save it from the wrecking ball.

Designated May 20, 1974
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#24: Jacobs House I
441 Toepfer Avenue
1937
Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect

Built for Herbert Jacobs, Madison journalist, and his wife, Catherine, this L-plan structure is the first of Wright's "Usonian" houses, a term he coined for houses he designed for middle income families. The horizontal emphasis of the earlier Prairie School is evident. Innovate construction techniques used in this house include a masonry core, pre-fabricated sandwich walls, elimination of basement and attic spaces and radiant heat flooring. The Jacobs family later commissioned Wright to build a second house for them, the Jacobs II house, which is also a Madison Landmark.

Designated May 20, 1974
National Historic Landmark
Landmark Nomination Form


#25: Steensland House
315 N. Carroll Street
1896
Gordon and Paunack

The Halle and Sophia Steensland House was designed by the noted local architectural firm of Gordon and Paunack. It is an excellent representative of the Victorian love of multiple materials and complicated and elegant details, including terra cotta ornament and leaded glass windows.

Halle Steensland was born in Norway in 1832 and came to Madison as a young man. Starting work as a store clerk, he eventually owned a grocery business, served as president of a major insurance company and founded the Savings Loan and Trust Co. (later the Bank of Madison). He was also prominent in Scandinavian circles and wrote for the Norwegian press, traveled all over the world, served as Vice Consul to Sweden and Norway and was well-known for his generous philanthropy.

Designated May 20, 1974
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#26: Dean House
4718 Monona Drive
ca. 1856

Nathaniel W. Dean was one of Madison's early pioneers. He was born in Massachusetts and came to Madison in 1842. He and his brother ran a general store that for several years was the leading commercial business in the village. In 1847 he married Harriet Morrison, daughter of one of Madison's earliest settlers. In 1857 Dean retired from the mercantile trade to devote his time to managing his land interests in the Town of Blooming Grove, which were extensive. This cream brick Italianate farmhouse was one of several that he owned, and because of its generous proportions was probably the one that his family lived in when they were not in Madison. He continued to expand his land interests into various other parts of Wisconsin and beyond, including a fine farm in Kansas. The Deans' downtown house was where the Park Hotel is now, and indeed, Dean built the original Park Hotel and moved the house off the site to make room for it. He died in 1880.

In 1926 the old farm became a private golf course and the Dean farmhouse was remodeled as the clubhouse. The City of Madison purchased the golf course in 1935 and continued using the farmhouse as the clubhouse until the 1970s. It has been restored by the Historic Blooming Grove Historical Society and is now the only historic house museum in the City of Madison.

Designated July 15, 1974
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#27: Elliott House
137 N. Prospect Avenue
1910
George Maher, architect

This exquisite Prairie Style house was designed by one of the most imaginative and influential designers of the Prairie School, George Maher of Chicago. Its simple rectangular form is enhanced by the battered (sloping) side walls. The segmental arch with ears over the front entrance is a Maher signature element, as are the lilac themed leaded glass windows. Other Prairie School attributes include the horizontal belt courses on the second story and the widely overhanging eaves. Maher designed several houses using this basic design, both before and after the Elliott house was built. Other architects adapted Maher's design, also, including the Sellery house at 2021 Van Hise Ave., built in the same year to the designs of Murphy and Cloyes of Chicago.

Elizabeth and Edward Elliott commissioned this house to be built and lived in it for five years. Edward Elliott was a professor of education who went on to be the chancellor at the University of Utah and President of Purdue University.

Designated July 15, 1974
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#28: Suhr House
121 Langdon Street
1887
John Nader, architect

This beautiful French Second Empire style house was built for John J. and Louisa Suhr in 1887. John Suhr immigrated to Madison from Germany. He worked for a Madison Bank until 1871 when he established his own "German-American Bank" to serve the many German immigrants in the Madison area. In 1887 he had a new building at 104 King Street built for his bank (the Suhr Building, also a Madison Landmark), and work was also completed on his family's new house at 121 Langdon Street. Capt. John Nader was a prominent local architect who also designed the City's first sewer system and St. Patrick's Church (404 E. Main St.)

Designated July 15, 1974
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#29: Collins House
704 E. Gorham Street
1912
Claude and Starck, architects

The Collins House was designed by Claude and Starck, Madison's most well known and prolific practitioners of the style, and this house is one of the finest examples of their work. It features the hallmarks of the Prairie style, including a strong horizontality created by bands of windows, a beltcourse under the second story windows, wide, overhanging eaves, extra long, narrow bricks, and simple, non-historic details. The house was built for William and Dora Collins. William Collins was his brother's partner in the Collins Brothers, a manufacturer and wholesaler of wood products. His brother, Cornelius, lived in a house just down the street, at 636 E. Gorham Street, built just four years before this house, and his niece Irene, built a house at 640 E. Gorham Street in 1920.

Designated March 17, 1975
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#30: Hirsig House
1010 Sherman Avenue
1913-1914
Alvan Small, architect

Local architect Alvan Small designed this Prairie style house for Louis and Marie Hirsig. Louis Hirsig was a partner in the highly successful Madison hardware firm of Wolff, Kubly, and Hirsig. Small, who studied under Louis Sullivan in Chicago for a year, designed houses with a beautiful sense of proportion. Small's work often is extremely simple and rectilinear in design, sometimes with a slight Japanese look, such as the Japanesque rafter ends projecting under the eaves. Small designed some of the finest Prairie style houses in Madison.

Designated March 17, 1975
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#31: Glenwood Children's Park
3502 Gregory Street
1949
Jens Jensen, landscape architect

Glenwood Children's Park is a former sandstone quarry that was used in the early years of Madison's history. It is said that North and South Halls on the UW campus were built from stone from this quarry. By the 1920s the quarry was merely an abandoned but picturesque glen. Members of the Madison Parks and Pleasure Drive Association identified it as a pleasant spot for a park in the 1920s, but it wasn't until 1943 that the Louis Gardner family purchased the site for public enjoyment. At the same time noted landscape architect Jens Jensen, known at the dean of the naturalistic style of landscaping, visited the dell and became interested in its development as a park for children. In 1949 Jensen returned to the park and supervised its renovation, with removal of alien species and the addition of flowering shrubs and trees and "council rings" for children's play.

Designated April 14, 1975
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#32: Vilas Circle and Curtis Indian Mounds
Vilas Circle Park, 1525 Vilas Avenue and 1108 Garfield Street
ca. 700 - 1200 A.D.

On the western edge of Vilas Circle Park is an Indian effigy mound in the shape of a bear. It is 82 feet long and is almost intact except for part of the rear leg which was lost to road development. There is also one linear mound of an original group of two remaining on private residential property south of Vilas Circle. The bear, in the religious beliefs of the mound builders, probably symbolized life on the earth's surface, including people; birds probably symbolized sky spirits; and mounds described in the past as "lizards" may have represented water spirits. It is not clear exactly what the linear mounds represented.

Wisconsin has the highest concentration of effigy mounds in the United States and the Madison area has one of the highest concentration of effigy mounds remaining. Most mounds were lost to 19th century agricultural practices and city development. The mound builders were farmers who also engaged in hunting and gathering. They lived in small villages and migrated from one to another based on the seasonal availability of natural resources. The mounds often, but not always, have burials associated with them, but their exact purpose is not entirely understood. Mounds tend to have been built in places with beautiful views of the surrounding countryside. The mounds are considered sacred by modern Native Americans and should be treated with respect.

Designated May 19, 1975
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#33: Forest Hill Cemetery and Effigy Mound Group
1 Speedway Road
ca. 700 - 1200 A.D. and 1857-1862

Forest Hill Cemetery was developed from 1857-1862 as the new city cemetery, replacing the smaller cemetery where Orton Park is today. It is one of the most intact examples of the rural cemetery movement of the 19th century, in which burials were set in a park like grounds that also served as a place for strolling, picnics and quiet recreation. The popularity of the rural cemeteries signaled the need for recreational space and gave impetus to the city parks movement. Historic buildings within the cemetery boundaries include the chapel-like receiving vault of ca. 1865, the John Catlin Memorial Chapel of 1878 and the Mausoleum, built in 1916. The cemetery office was built in 1908 for that purpose and also served as a shelter for people waiting for the streetcar at what was then the end of the line. Interesting interments include sections for soldiers and orphans of the Civil War, a section for Confederate prisoners of war who died at Camp Randall, a section for other war veterans, and sections for some of Madison's earliest Jewish citizens.

The beautiful views of the whole surrounding area were the reason for acquiring the land as a city cemetery, but it was also the same reason that the Native Americans used the site for their burials and effigy mounds many centuries before. The Forest Hill Cemetery Mound Group once consisted of seven mounds and now consists of two "panther" mounds (probably actually water spirits), a linear mound and a flying bird.

Designated 5/19/75 and revised 4/15/90
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#34: Burrows Park Effigy Mound and Campsite
25 Burrows Road
700-1200 A.D.

On a rise just east of the Burrows Park parking lot is a straight-winged bird effigy mound with a wingspan of about 128 feet. A "running fox" mound used to exist north of the bird. The bird effigy was restored in 1934 by removing tree stumps, repairing mutilations caused by vandals and resodding.

The bird, in the religious beliefs of the mound builders, probably symbolized sky spirits; mounds described in the past as "lizards" may have represented water spirits, and bears and other animals may have represented people and other creatures that lived on the earth's surface.

Wisconsin has the highest concentration of effigy mounds in the United States and the Madison area has one of the highest concentration of effigy mounds remaining. Most mounds were lost to 19th century agricultural practices and city development. The mound builders were farmers who also engaged in hunting and gathering. They lived in small villages and migrated from one to another based on the seasonal availability of natural resources. The mounds often, but not always, have burials associated with them, but their exact purpose is not entirely understood. Mounds tend to have been built in places with beautiful views of the surrounding countryside. The mounds are considered sacred by modern Native Americans and should be treated with respect.

Designated May 19, 1975
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#35: Milwaukee Road Depot
640 W. Washington Avenue
1903
Frost and Granger, Chicago, architects

The first railroad depot in Madison was built on this site in 1853. The first railroad train arrived in Madison from Milwaukee on May 23, 1854. according to an eye witness:

It was a grand, but strange spectacle to see this monster train, like some huge, unheard-of thing of life, with breath of smoke and flame, emerging from the green openings - scenes of pastoral beauty and quietude - beyond the placid waters of the lake.

This area became one of the liveliest places in Madison when the railroad was the only means of long-distance transportation. The new passenger depot was built on this site at a time when the capital city was a rail hub of nine rail lines, providing linkages for farm, business, government and recreation. The construction of this imposing neo-classical building marked the heyday of the railroad as the prime mover of people and goods.

Designated September 8, 1975
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#36: American Exchange Bank
1 N. Pinckney Street
1871
Stephen Vaughn Shipman, architect

This beautiful Italianate style building was designed by Madison architect Stephen Vaughn Shipman. Erected of local sandstone, it is one of the finest Italianate commercial buildings remaining in Madison. Built as the Park Savings Bank, the structure was originally several bays wider to the left. The left-hand section of the building was destroyed by fire long ago. In 1922 the American Exchange Bank moved into the corner part of the building. During World War I the old German-American Bank, located at the time in the Suhr Building, was renamed the American Exchange Bank, no doubt to eliminate any connotation of sympathy with the enemy. The American Exchange Bank moved into this building in 1922 and remained there until recent times. The building occupies the former site of the American House hotel, a pioneer structure where the first session of the Wisconsin territorial legislature was held.

Designated September 8, 1975
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#37: Hickory Hill
1721 Hickory Drive
ca. 1860

This old farmhouse was probably built around the year 1860 for the Samuel Grubb family. The Grubbs farmed on the property until around 1866 when the Roder family bought it. They ran a market garden here for about 30 years, on their 130 acre farm, which at that time extended northward to the Lake Mendota shore. Later the Baker family farmed here for about forty years (hence the name of Baker Ave., which runs along the east side of the lot). The farm's close proximity to the city no doubt made the gardening of fruits and vegetables for market a lucrative activity. The house is significant because it is made of our native Madison sandstone.

Designated October 6, 1975
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#38: Fess Hotel
119 - 123 E. Doty Street
1883, 1901
Gordon and Paunack, architects of 1901 remodeling

The Fess Hotel was established on this site ca. 1856 by George Fess, an immigrant from England. Fess had previously run a grocery store and eating house on the site. The western half of the existing building was built of cream brick in 1883 in the same design as the original part of the hotel, which was to the west where the Government East parking ramp is today. The original portion was demolished long ago. Because the cream brick section was built to mimic the 1850s design of the hotel, it has an old-fashioned configuration of residential windows on the first floor which was a feature of most buildings erected in Madison and around the country up until plate glass was invented in the 1860s. The eastern half of the existing building was also built ca. 1880, but in 1901 it was remodeled in the fashionable style of the time, the Queen Anne. This section is one of the most intact of the Queen Anne style commercial buildings in Madison.

The Fess Hotel business served railroad travelers, legislators, and weekly boarders. The operation, which took up a large part of the block, also included a saloon, dining room, barber shop, ice house and a livery that could stable up to 60 horses. The hotel remained in the Fess family until it was sold in 1973 to be renovated as a restaurant.

Designated October 6, 2005
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#39: Orton Park
1103 Spaight Street
1887

Orton Park comprises the entire Block 180 of the original plat of Madison. The settlement of Madison was officially recognized as a village in 1846 and in 1848 Block 180 was designated as the village's official cemetery. In 1857, however, shortly after Madison became a city, the land that is now Forest Hill Cemetery was purchased for that purpose. In 1877 all of the burials that could be found where removed from the old village cemetery and reinterred at Forest Hill. In 1883 the old cemetery site was declared an official city park, the first in Madison. It was named after Harlow S. Orton, one of Madison's former mayors and a supreme court justice at the time. In 1887 the park was officially opened. Orton Park remained the city's first public park until the Madison Parks and Pleasure Drive Association started their campaign to add parks to the city at the turn-of-the-last-century.

Designated October 6, 1975
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#40: Hyer's Hotel
854 Jenifer Street
1854

The oldest urban hotel building to survive in Madison, Hyer's Hotel was built in 1854 by David and Anna Hyer, who in 1837 came to the site that would become Madison with small group of settlers hired to build the first capitol building. The Hyers' first house downtown was run by Anna as a boarding house. Anna died in 1843 and David ran a hotel/tavern in Deerfield until 1854 when he built his new hotel here on Jenifer Street. Originally the hotel consisted of a two-story Italianate house that remains today, with a large wood frame wing of hotel rooms extending to the rear; behind that was a stable for visitors' horses. Shortly after Hyer built the hotel, however, he sold it to the Jacquish family, who operated the hotel and also had a tavern in the building. A fire in 1874 destroyed the stable and the frame portion of the hotel. After the fire, a small brick wing was built where the hotel wing had been and the house was converted into a single-family residence. The main portion of the building was constructed of Madison's native red brick, which was dug and fired nearby. The local red brick was a very soft brick that was superceded when the railroad arrived, allowing heavy materials, such as Milwaukee's harder "Cream City" brick, to be used in Madison. From 1910 until his death in 1972, Arthur Schulkamp lived in the house; Schulkamp was active in insurance and banking and was a well-known philanthropist.

Designated November 3, 1975
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#41: Plough Inn
3402 Monroe Street
1853 and 1858

The original structure on this site was a stone house built for German immigrants Frederick and Amelia Paunack. Mr. Paunack was a stonecutter and probably cut the sandstone for his house from the nearby quarry that is now Glenwood Children's Park. In 1858 a larger two-story brick section was added in front of the small house. The bricks came from a brickyard near the Old Spring Tavern on Nakoma Road. The front section is in the vernacular Greek Revival style. The stone and brick were covered with stucco in the early 20th century. The Plough Inn, established by John and Isabella Whare about the time the brick section was built, served as a road house for people traveling to and from the southwestern parts of Wisconsin, including Monroe (hence, Monroe Street) and Wiota (hence nearby Wyota Ave.). The Plough Inn was a favorite jaunt for soldiers living at Camp Randall during the Civil War and continued to be used as a tavern into the 20th century.

Designated November 3, 1975
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#42: Lamp House
22 N. Butler Street
1903
Frank Lloyd Wright, architect

It is ironic, given the controversy that surrounded Frank Lloyd Wright's life and the near veneration that his buildings now inspire, that the earliest surviving example of his work in his boyhood hometown is all but unknown to most Madisonians. Certainly the site of the house is partly to blame since it is located in the center of the block bounded by Butler, Mifflin, Webster and East Washington, where it is screened from view by the buildings that are placed around the block's perimeter.

Wright's client was his boyhood companion and lifelong friend, Robert M. Lamp, who by 1903 had become a successful travel, real estate and insurance agent. Lamp's two-story flat-roofed house is of brick construction and its cubical form gives it a distinctly urban feeling that is in keeping with its location a block from the capitol square. Wright's design also originally included an elaborate roof top garden, an amenity that disappeared in 1913 when the garden was enclosed and turned into an apartment. Lamp's Butler Street house is actually the second of his homes that Wright had a hand in designing. The first was a now vanished summer cottage known as "Rocky Roost" for the small island is occupied in Lake Mendota.

Designated January 28, 1976
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#43: Braley House
422 N. Henry Street
1875-1876

This Gothic Revival style house was built for Judge Arthur B. and Philinda Braley. Judge Braley was born in New York state and studied law in New York and Delavan, Wisconsin. He came to Madison in 1848 and held the positions of police justice, city attorney and alderperson before being elected as a Dane county judge in 1874, a position which he held until his death in 1889. He was political editor of two local newspapers, a well respected writer, and a lover of Shakespeare. Famous 19th century poet, Ella Wheeler Wilcox, was a close personal friend of the Braleys and visited the house often. Wilcox wrote the famous poem which begins "laugh and the world laughs with you, weep and you weep alone."

Designated April 19, 1976
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#44: Hiestand School
4418 Milwaukee Street
1915

Since about 1855 this site has been the location of the District No. 1 school for families in the Town of Blooming Grove and parts of the Town of Burke. Blooming Grove township school. The original frame building was razed in 1915 to make way for this fully modern stucco-covered building. Named eventually for pioneer tobacco grower, Jacob Hiestand, whose farmstead was across the road, this one-room school is noteworthy as a progressively designed facility, as a community center and as a reminder of the rural heritage of the township. It was in use as a schoolhouse until ca. 1955. It is one of the few one-room schoolhouses remaining intact in Dane County.

Designated April 19, 1976
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#45: Grace Episcopal Church
116 W. Washington Avenue
1855-1858
James Douglas, architect

A gracious Capitol Square landmark for over 150 years, Grace Episcopal Church was built of our native golden sandstone and is a distinguished example of the Gothic Revival style, inspired by the Gothic Revival that was in vogue for English religious structures at the time. The church was designed by pioneer Milwaukee architect James Douglas. Grace Episcopal congregation was established in 1839 and was one of the first churches founded in the tiny settlement that would become the City of Madison.

Designated May 24, 1976
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#46: Slaughter-Shuttleworth House
946 Spaight Street
1854

In Madison's first decades, several families built their houses along the Lake Monona shore. The most imposing house was Governor Farwell's octagonal mansion , which was roughly kitty-corner from this house. Another was the sandstone Ford mansion at 1033 Spaight Street and Hyer's Hotel at 854 Jenifer St. This simple Italianate house is built of the local red brick that was used before the railroads were in place and could ship the harder cream-colored Milwaukee brick to Madison.

The first resident-owners of this house appear to have been D. B. and Mary Shipley. Mr. Shipley was a railroad contractor. In the late 1870s Colonel William Slaughter and his family lived here. Slaughter was one of the first non-native persons to visit the Madison area. He served in 1835 as register of the Green Bay land office and also as a member of the Michigan territorial legislature who voted to separate the Wisconsin Territory from Michigan. Before any white people lived in what would become Madison, Slaughter had moved to Middleton where he platted the "City of the Four Lakes," one of about two dozen contenders for the location of the territorial capitol, the contest won, of course, by James Doty's plat for Madison. From 1893 to 1970 the house was owned by Farrand K. and Elizabeth Shuttleworth. Mr. Shuttleworth and his son of the same name were attorneys.

Designated October 18, 1976
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#47: Bernard-Hoover Boathouse
622-1/2 E. Gorham Street
1915

In the days before individual boat ownership became widespread, renting pleasure boats for lake excursions was a significant summer business in Madison. Numerous commercial enterprises developed here in the nineteenth century to cater to the demand, the first being the one German native Charles Bernard started on this site in 1855 as a fishing station.

Gradually, Bernard's business expanded to include both boat and fishing gear rentals.

By the 1890s Bernard was building his own boats as well, including several large, steam-powered excursion boats that operated on Lake Mendota. Bernard ferried picnickers to his private park (gone) near Mendota State Hospital. After his death in 1907, son William ran the business. William and his son Carl became known across the United States as avid ice boat builders and racers.

In 1911 the Bernards replaced the original buildings with a larger frame structure. Four years later that building was destroyed by fire and was replaced with the present frame building. Carl Bernard sold out to Harry Hoover in 1943; Hoover continued to operate the board livery and gave excursion rides until 1968 when he sold the property to the City. Today the Bernard-Hoover boathouse is the only survivor of the early days of Madison's love affair with pleasure boating.

Designated October 18, 1976
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#48: Cutter House
1030 Jenifer Street
1882

J. C. Cutter, identified in city directories as a "capitalist," apparently built this house as an investment property, because it was leased to various tenants until 1890. It retains much of its original surface trim, including panels of decorative siding in a variety of patterns. The steeply-pitched gables have elaborate braces and bargeboards, and some windows are capped with shed-type window hoods. The Cutter house is the best example of the rare Stick Style remaining in Madison and it is one of the most highly detailed nineteenth century buildings in the City. In our harsh climate many old buildings that have survived to the 21st century have had much of their original trim either removed or covered by siding, making the elaborate decoration on the Cutter all the more important to preserve.

Designated December 20, 1976
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#49: Brittingham Boathouse
617 North Shore Drive
1910
Ferry and Clas

The construction of this public boathouse represents the spirit of municipal improvement that infused this city at the turn of the last century. The parkland and its model facilities were created through the generosity of lumberman Thomas E. Brittingham and the hard work of a private group, the Madison Park and Pleasure Drive Association, headed by John M. Olin. The facilities also included a large bath house to the west, which was demolished in the 1960s. In 1921 a wing for more boat storage was added to the south in the same design as the original. George B. Ferry and Alfred C. Clas of Milwaukee were distinguished architects known here for their design of the Wisconsin Historical Society building on campus. The boathouse was built on former marshland and has structural problems as a result. It is planned in the near future to move it a little way to sounder ground and renovate the historic structure.

Designated July 18, 1977
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#50: City Market
101 N. Blount Street
1909
Robert L. Wright

The City Market was commissioned by the City of Madison in 1909 in an early effort at civic improvement, part of the nation-wide "City Beautiful" movement. The structure was designed to provide a less congested and more sheltered place away from the capitol square, where area farmers could sell their produce to city consumers. Its use as a market, however, was short lived due mostly to the fact that both shoppers and farmers didn't want to be so far away from the commercial heart of the city. By the 1920s the market building was serving as a dance hall and teen center. For many years the building was used as a garage for the city streets department.

The Prairie style, an idiom used mainly in the upper Midwest between 1900 and WWI, is more commonly associated with residential buildings. The design for the market, created by local architect Robert L. Wright, is an unusual non-residential example of the style. The City Market's major Prairie style elements include its long, low massing, an overall emphasis on horizontal lines displayed in three horizontal belt courses, widely overhanging eaves projecting from shallowly hipped roofs, and windows grouped together in horizontal bands. The building was renovated as apartments in 1987 in an award-winning adaptive reuse project.

Designated July 18, 1976
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#51: Sauthoff House
739 Jenifer Street
1857

Frederick and Johanna Sauthoff built this red brick house in 1857 shortly after they moved here from Hannover, Germany. Frederick Sauthoff was a tailor whose shop was on King Street. The Sauthoffs had several children, all active and gifted athletes and musicians. the house remained in the Sauthoff family until sometime after 1930. The house was at the center of the near eastside German enclave.

Only houses of the pioneer era were built in Madison of our local red brick, because it was a softer brick that was supplanted soon after the railroads arrived to transport heavy goods by the harder "Cream City" brick from Milwaukee. The Sauthoff house is a simplified Italianate design with the signature Italianate eaves brackets.

Designated August 15, 1977
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#52: Kircher House
733 Jenifer Street
1876

An example of High Victorian Italianate house design, this cream brick dwelling was probably built by John Kircher, a German carpenter and contractor. Nearly all of the surrounding properties going westward toward the square were occupied by German families. In 1892, the house as bought by Adolph Klose who was a tailor on the square. Klose had formerly lived in a small frame house he built across the street at 748 Jenifer Street. As with many smaller houses near the square, the true history of this house is hard to discern through traditional tax and city directory research. Part of this house may actually date to the late 1850s.

Designated August 15, 1977
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#53: Klose House
748 Jenifer Street
ca. 1870

This small wood-frame cottage gives us a glimpse of what downtown Madison's residential streets looked like in the pioneer era. Small frame and brick houses were built throughout the center city in the early days, but most were supplanted by larger houses as time went on. Not many of the small original cottages remain and almost none remain in such intact condition as the Klose house. Adolph and Mary Klose probably built this house ca. 1870. Klose, a tailor, helped found the Journeyman's Tailor's Union in 1864 and served as its president in 1882. He was among a community of German artisans and shopkeepers clustered at the western end of the neighborhood.

When the Klose family became more prosperous in the 1890s, they sold their little cottage and moved into the more substantial brick house across the street at 733 Jenifer Street.

Designated August 15, 1977
Landmark Nomination Form


#54: Lougee House
620 S. Ingersoll Street
1907
Claude and Starck

The Lougee house was designed by noted local architects Claude and Starck. With its broad, slate-shingled roof, horizontal massing, belt courses and sweeping terrace, it is an excellent example of the Prairie School of architecture. It is similar in appearance to Frank Lloyd Wright's Harley Bradley house in Kankakee, Illinois, built in 1900.

Lougee (1850-1932) was a native of Exeter, New Hampshire. He operated a number of hotels and clubs, including the Park Hotel and University Club in Madison, and the Palmer House in Chicago.

Designated September 19, 1977
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#55: Biederstadt-Breitenbach Grocery
853 Williamson Street
1874

The Biederstadt-Breitenbach Grocery was built in 1874 after the large fire that destroyed the back wing of Hyer's Hotel at 754 Jenifer Street also destroyed Biederstadt's grocery store on this site. Biederstadt soon rebuilt a large brick store building on the site and operated a grocery store until his death in 1890. The storefront was then leased the George C. Breitenbach and his son George F. The Breitenbach family eventually bought the building and continued to operate the store until 1951. A 1949 article in the Capital Times summed up the importance of the building:

Williamson Street in the old days was a very importance thoroughfare...it was by far the best (an under certain weather conditions, the only) street that tapped the rich farming country to the east and even the northeast of Madison. And Breitenbach's corner ...was the busiest spot on the street. The hitching posts and curb rings always tethered a full quota of farm wagons or bob sleds.

As was usual in those days, the grocery store also sold dry goods, feed, china and glassware. It also had a popular candy counter and the storefront at 851 was run by the family as a saloon. Of the several corner grocery store buildings remaining the Biederstadt-Breitenbach Grocery is the best and most intact example.

Designated September 19, 1977
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#56: Curtis-Kittleson House
1102 Spaight Street
1901
Gordon and Paunack, architects

William D. and Mary Curtis commissioned the architectural partnership of J. O. Gordon and F. W. Paunack to design this eclectic brick house with Queen Anne and chateauesque stylistic references. W. D. Curtis was the president of the local horse collar pad company begun by his father, Dexter Curtis. The elder Curtis had discovered that impregnating the collar pads of horses with zinc kept the horses from getting sores on their necks. He established the Dexter Curtis Company and made a fortune with his special saddlery equipment. The firm grew so successful that it eventually had branch factories in England and France. Of course, the development of the automobile spelled the end of success for the company, and most Madisonians today have never heard of it. In addition to running the Curtis Co., son W. D. Curtis also served a term as the mayor of Madison.

In 1949 the house was purchased by I. Milo and Ida Kittleson. Milo Kittleson was a banker who served three terms as Madison's mayor, and Ida devoted much of her time to charitable and philanthropic work.

Designated May 15, 1978
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#57: Miller House
647 E. Dayton Street
moved 1908

The earliest known Black-owned building remaining in Madison, this unassuming house was the residence of two generations of the Miller family. William Miller came to Madison from Kentucky in 1901 to serve as a messenger for then-Governor "Fighting Bob" La Follette. William and his wife Anna Mae were local leaders in the advancement of African American people, as were their descendants who lived in the house. The Millers leased the house to roomers until 1919 when they moved into it from the house next door (demolished in 1976). The building is in the heart of a small historic Black neighborhood dating back to 1898.

Designated December 18, 1978
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#58: Lincoln School
720 E. Gorham Street
1915
Claude and Starck, architects

Lincoln School is a superb example of the Prairie School of architecture. Some of the reflections of this style are the bands of terra cotta and stone that emphasize the horizontal lines of the design, detailed terra cotta ornament on capitals and over the doors, and a modern expression, devoid of historical motifs. Lincoln School is the finest remaining of several similar school buildings in Wisconsin designed by the local architectural firm of Louis W. Claude and Edward F. Starck.

Designated December 18, 1978
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#59: Ott House
754 Jenifer Street
1873

The Ott house is one of the finest High Victorian houses in Madison and the grandest remaining 19th century mansion in the Third Lake Ridge Historic District. German craftsmen probably executed the intricate woodwork on porches and bays, detailed brickwork and carved stone trim. Arriving here from Switzerland in 1850, Ott rose to prominence in business, ethnic, and civic affairs. He served his neighborhood as alderman and county supervisor and led the campaign to turn the old village cemetery into Orton Park.

Designated October 1, 1979
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#60: Thorstrand -- the Swenson Estate
1-2 Thorstrand Road
1922
Law and Law, Architects

These two Mediterranean Revival mansions were designed for Magnus and Annie Swenson and their daughter Mary North by Madison architects Law and Law. Swenson was a Norwegian immigrant who became an internationally famous inventor and humanitarian. Among his many and varied activities, Swenson patented over 200 machines and processes, built hydroelectric dams on the Wisconsin River, and founded the Norwegian-American Steamship Lines. Please respect the privacy of the occupants.

Designated December 17, 1979
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#61: First Church of Christ, Scientist
315 Wisconsin Avenue
1929
Frank M. Riley, Architect

Designed with simplicity and grace, the First Church of Christ, Scientist is Georgian Revival in style, the form used for many early 20th century Christian Science churches across the country. It is the only Madison church designed by Frank Riley, one of the city's finest architects in the period revival styles. The congregation chose to locate on Wisconsin Avenue, a street that until the 1950's was lined with the steeples and domes of many of Madison's most historic churches.

Designated March 10, 1980
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#62: Machinery Row
601-627 Williamson Street
1898-1914
Conover and Porter, Architects

This block-long group of brick buildings was originally known the Brown Brothers' Business Block. It earned the nickname "Machinery Row" when several agricultural implement branch houses located here, part of the lively railroad shipping business that flourished in Madison in the early 1900s. This substantial Romanesque Revival block was designed by the prominent local architectural firm Conover and Porter. It was built gradually, in sections, replacing older wooden structures and an ice house.

Designated March 10, 1980
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#63: Jackman Building
111 S. Hamilton Street
1913-1914
Claude and Starck, Architects

The Jackman Building is an unusual and valuable example of early twentieth century commercial architecture because it is preserved virtually intact both inside and out. It was built for the law firm of Richmond, Jackman and Swanson. Their successors occupied the second and most of the third floor until 1976. In style the building is a simplified version of the Classical Revival. Classical elements include the decorative cornice and stonework around the main entrance.

Designated July 21, 1980
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#64: Kayser House
802 E. Gorham Street
1902
Claude and Starck, Architects

The Adolph H. Kayser house was designed by Claude and Starck, a local architectural firm that would later become the foremost practitioner of the Prairie School Style in Madison. The design of the Kayser house is a distinctive blend of classical details, then very popular, and the broad horizontal lines and simple massing of the Prairie School, which was just coming into vogue. Kayser was a prominent Madison lumber dealer who also served as mayor of Madison from 1914 to 1916.

Designated July 21, 1980
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#65: Clarke House
1150 Spaight Street
1899
Claude and Starck, Architects

One of Claude and Starck's earliest designs, this Queen Anne house has a Gothic theme, with pointed-arched windows and steeply pitched roofs. It was designed for B. B. Clarke, who earned a fortune in Indiana by manufacturing threshing machines before he moved to Madison in 1890. From 1898 to his death in 1929, Clarke published The American Thresherman, an influential international journal specializing in the development and use of farm machinery.

Designated February 16, 1981
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#66: St. Bernard's Catholic Church
2450 Atwood Avenue
1926-1927
John Flad, Architect

Since it was founded in 1907, St. Bernard's Parish has been a religious and social focus of neighborhood life on the East side. This imposing church building was erected during a decade of heavy construction activity among Madison's religious institutions, much of which was directed toward serving the rapidly growing suburbs. The native sandstone structure was the largest Catholic church in the city when it was built. The architect, John Flad, designed many Catholic churches throughout the Midwest.

Designated March 16, 1981
Landmark Nomination Form


#67: Riley House
2930 Lakeland Avenue
1908
Frank M. Riley, Architect

This imposing house was the first of many fine Colonial Revival designs by Madison architect Frank Riley. It has the superb details and gracious proportions that were to become hallmarks of Riley's work. He designed this house for his parents, Edward and Eliza Riley, while he was living in Boston. Riley also lived in this house from his return to Madison in 1915 until his death in 1949. The Riley family was influential in East side real estate development and civic affairs.

Designated July 13, 1981
Landmark Nomination Form


#68: Loftsgordon House
2429 Center Avenue
1918

Herman Loftsgordon and his family lived in this house from 1918 until 1946. Loftsgordon was one of five brothers who came to Madison from Mt. Horeb in the early 1900's and settled within blocks of each other in the Elmside plat. The family was prominent in the development of the east side. Herman Loftsgordon served as vice-president of Security Bank, was a founder and board chairman of Anchor Savings and Loan, and developed the Eastwood Theater. He ran for mayor and was active in Norwegian-American associations.

Designated July 13, 1981
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#69: Bush House
14 S. Broom Street
ca. 1867

Built of cream brick, this handsome Italianate house was constructed for Derrick C. Bush (1816-1887). A Vermont native, Bush became the village of Madison's first assessor in 1854, and later, a county judge. A later owner, Phineas Baldwin, was a state assemblyman who became a Dane County sheriff. Note the decorative side bay, original shutters, bracketed cornice and intricate porch details.

Designated January 18, 1982
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#70: Stang-Wirth House
2817 Milwaukee Street
ca. 1867

This simple brick dwelling was built for Frederick Stang, a Bavarian immigrant and market gardener. His house is one of the last vestiges of these early-day fruit and vegetable farms on the fringes of the city. In 1883, a later owner, Jacob Wirth, also from Germany, enlarged the house substantially. The brick for the house is believed to have come from a brickyard that was located at the west corner of Milwaukee and North Streets and East Washington Avenue.

Designated January 10, 1983
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#71: Lamb Building
114 State Street
1905
Claude and Starck, Architects

With its two-story bay, leaded glass detail, and original Carroll Street storefront, this is one of Madison's best remaining adaptations of the Queen Anne style to commercial architecture. Constructed for retired attorney F. J. Lamb, the building was designed by the prominent local firm of Claude and Starck. The building has been used for a variety of commercial purposes.

Designated January 10, 1983
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#72: Phi Gamma Delta House
16 Langdon Street
1927
Law, Law and Potter, Architects

This campus home of graduate and undergraduate members of Mu Chapter of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, this imposing English Tudor revival style house was designed by Law, Law and Potter, Madison's most successful architectural firm in the 1920s and 1930s. The floor plan has three parts, with the "Alumni Cottage" at the front, the dormitory section in the middle and the stately "Great Hall" lakeside. This unique concept was developed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright, who worked on early designs for the house.

Designated April 25, 1983
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#73: Brown House
28 Langdon Street
1905

This handsome house was built by Frank G. Brown (1852-1920), scion of a prominent real estate and banking family. Brown, who was first vice-president of the First National Bank, was a founder of the French Battery Company (now Rayovac). The Brown house, with its detailed cornice and fan light over the front door, is a fine example of Georgian Revival architecture. In 1927 this property was purchased from the family by the Iota Chapter of Alpha Phi Sorority.

Designated April 25, 1983
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#74: Casserly House
403 W. Washington Avenue
1891

The Casserly house is a classic example of a Queen Anne style house built for a middle-class family. James Casserly was a foreman and later superintendent of the Madison Democrat, one of Madison's two major newspapers at the turn-of-the-century. The Casserlys were one of many families of Irish descent who lived in this neighborhood. In the 1960s, the house became a rooming house and its condition deteriorated. In 1980, it was carefully restored as offices and an apartment.

Designated April 25, 1983
Landmark Nomination Form


#75: Holy Redeemer Roman Catholic Church and School
Church 1865-1869
School 1892
120-142 W. Johnson Street
John Nader, Architect

This is the first parish organized by German Catholics and is the second oldest Catholic church in Madison. This church replaces the original brick structure built on this site in 1857 by the 80 founding families The simple Romanesque Revival structure was designed by architect John Nader and built of native sandstone. The contractor, James Livesey, also built Bascom Hall. The steeple, bells, clock, stained glass windows and other embellishments were later additions.

Designated July 11, 1983
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#76: Corry Carriage House
2906 Lakeland Avenue
1911

This quaint stone carriage house was built for James and Minnie Corry. Corry, a well-known realtor, helped develop the Fair Oaks plat and was a promoter of the east side. The Corrys' plans to build a house in front of the carriage house were halted when Corry died unexpectedly at the age of 44. Used as a garage and temporary residence, the building was remodeled as a permanent residence in 1946. It is one of only a handful of carriage houses left in the city, a rare reminder of the days of the horse and buggy.

Designated September 12, 1983
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#77: Fire Station # 4
1329 W. Dayton Street
1904-1905
Lew F. Porter, architect

Designed by local architect, Lew F. Porter, Fire Station # 4 is one of the oldest fire stations remaining in Madison. The tiny windows on the east facade lit horse stalls. The rapid expansion of University Heights, Wingra Park and other near west side neighborhoods at the turn-of-the-century necessitated the construction of the fire house, which was the first built outside of the central city. In 1983, the Fire Department moved and in 1984 the building was sensitively rehabilitated into six townhouse apartments.

Designated October 10, 1983
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#78: Wootton-Mead House
120 W. Gorham Street
1907

This impressive stucco and brick house was built for Addie and Frank M. Wootton, an attorney who became one of Madison's first automobile dealers. From 1914 to 1948, it was the home of Daniel And Katie Mead. Mead was a UW professor of engineering and a world-famous designer of dams and hydroelectric power plants. The Prairie Style house, with its bands of leaded glass windows, Sullivanesque ornament and horizontal lines, was faithfully restored in 1983.

Designated March 5, 1984
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#79: Commons House
1645 Norman Way
1913
Cora Tuttle, architect

This large stucco house was designed by noted Madison bungalow designer, Cora Tuttle. From 1913 to 1937, it was the home of John R. Commons, a U.W. professor of economics. Commons was nationally significant as the author of important social reforms in the progressive era that helped pave the way for Roosevelt's New Deal. Commons was the mentor of many outstanding economists and is credited with originating the "Wisconsin Idea," in which University faculty serve as advisors to state government.

Designated July 9, 1984
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#80: Hoffman- Kennedy Dairy Horse Barn
2020 Eastwood Drive
Circa 1904

This simple brick horse barn was built by Conrad Hoffman, a laborer. In 1925, it was purchased by the largest dairy in Madison, the Kennedy Dairy, to house its east side branch. The barn had deteriorated seriously by 1985 when it was renovated into offices. The row of ten tiny windows along the west side of the barn, one for each horse's stall, and the pulleys above the hayloft are rare visual reminders of the horse-and-buggy era.

Designated March 3, 1986
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#81: Bellevue Apartments
29 E. Wilson Street
1913-1914

Constructed by local builder Charles E. Marks, the Bellevue was the largest and most expensive apartment building erected during Madison's pre-World War I apartment building boom. Advertised as a place of "ease and comfort," the Bellevue featured such Victorian luxuries as built-in leaded glass bookcases and fireplaces. The building pioneered modern conveniences, including electric elevators, food and laundry service, and centralized vacuum, trash disposal and refrigerator systems.

Designated December 1, 1986
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#82: "Elmside" the Simeon and Maria Mills House
2709 Sommers Avenue
1863

This elegant Italian villa style house was constructed of native sandstone on the 191-acre country estate of Simeon and Maria Mills. An early pioneer from Ohio, Mills erected Madison's first store and was a banker, real estate developer and respected civic leader who was instrumental in the growth and prosperity of Madison. He was a founder of Madison's first insurance company, the first newspaper, two major railroads, and, as a state senator, helped establish the University of Wisconsin.

Designated December 7, 1987
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#83: Monona Lake Assembly Normal Hall
1156 Olin-Turville Court
1884
D. R. Jones, Architect

This pavilion was built as a 450-seat lecture hall for the Monona Lake Assembly. Established to provide instruction for Sunday school teachers, it soon became a popular summer camp for tourists from throughout the Midwest. As many as 15,000 came each year for religious instruction, entertainment, recreation, and lectures by such notables as William McKinley and "Fighting Bob" La Follette. The Normal Hall is one of the last buildings remaining from Madison's heyday as a resort community.

Designated March 21, 1988
Landmark Nomination Form


#84: Chi Psi Lodge
150 Iota Court
1911-1913
Alexander C. Eschweiler, Architect

This imposing fraternity house was designed by noted Milwaukee architect, Alexander C. Eschweiler and was built using Madison's native sandstone. Its Tudor Revival style is one of the best examples of that architecture in Madison. The Iota chapter of Chi Psi was founded here in 1878 and is one of the oldest fraternal orders at the University of Wisconsin.

Designated April 18, 1988
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#85: Delta Upsilon Fraternity
644 N. Frances Street
1906-1907
Jennings and Kronenberg, Architects

Founded in the spring of 1885, the Wisconsin Chapter of Delta Upsilon Fraternity has occupied this stately structure since 1907. Delta Upsilon Fraternity is unique among local fraternities as a non-secret Greek letter society since it has no secret meetings, handshakes, passwords or mottoes. This red brick chapter house, decorated with Flemish gables, is an excellent local example of the early English Revival style. It was designed by the local architectural firm of Jennings and Kronenberg.

Designated November 7, 1988
Landmark Nomination Form


#86: City Horse Barn
202 N. Blount Street
1910-1914

This simple brick structure is a rare survivor of the horse-and-wagon era. Built as part of the old city yards, the barn housed up to nine draft horses whose job it was to pull maintenance and service vehicles. Each of the nine windows on the Dayton Street side provided light and air to a separate horse stall. Doors under the arches at each end led to the haymow. When gas replaced horse power in the 1930's, the barn was converted into offices. The Madison Mutual Housing Authority renovated it into offices and two apartments in 1987.

Designated March 6, 1988
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#87: Grimm Book Bindery
454 W. Gilman Street
1926
Alvan Small, Flad and Associates, architect

The Grimm Book Bindery was founded in Madison in 1874. Gottlieb Grimm came to Madison from Germany in 1850 and in that year bound what is probably the first book bound in Madison. After working for others for over two decades, Grimm became head of the Madison Book Bindery and changed its name to his. By 1926, when this building was constructed for it, the bindery had an extensive business working for state government, the university, libraries and businesses, an enterprise that continues to this day.

The building was designed by noted local architect, Alvan Small, in a simple red brick Georgian Revival style, intended to be reminiscent of the red brick Georgian style printing office of Benjamin Franklin in Philadelphia.

In the late 1980s the Grimm Book Bindery moved to larger premises. The Alexander Company purchased the building and renovated it into apartments in a rehabilitation project that was both imaginative and innovative.

Designated August 7, 1989
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#88: Wiedenbeck-Dobelin Warehouse
619 W. Mifflin Street
1907 and ca. 1915
Claude and Starck, architects

The two-story section of this brick and concrete industrial structure was built in 1907 for the Wiedenbeck-Dobelin Co., founded in 1894 by T. E. Wiedenbeck and Charles W. Dobelin. Wiedenbeck was born in the town of Madison ca. 1868. After working as a printer's devil and helping in his father's brick business, he began working in the early 1890s as a traveling salesman for Sumner and Morris, a large hardware concern on the square. While working there he became friends with Dobelin, a tinsmith for Sumner and Morris, who came to Madison fro Loganville, WI as a child. In 1894 they formed their new business as suppliers to blacksmiths and wagonmakers. They located at first on S. Bedford across from the IC passenger depot, and had three other buildings nearby. In 1907 they built the existing building and a second warehouse was built in 1915. From blacksmith and wagonmaking supplies, which became largely obsolete as automobiles replaced horses and wagons, they quickly branched into wholesale heavy hardware, lumber. etc. They dealt throughout the United States. In its time the firm was one of the largest businesses in Madison. Dobelin died of a heart attack in 1930, but Wiedenbeck continued to have an interest in the firm until his death in 1960.

Designated August 7, 1989
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#89: Badger State Shoe Factory
123 N. Blount Street
1910
Ferdinand Kronenberg, architect

From East Johnson Street a broad, level plain stretches across the isthmus to the Third Lake ridge that borders Lake Monona. Originally, this plain was the "Great Central Marsh," a barrier to development as long as it remained unfilled. Once filling began in the 1890s, however, much of the new land was developed for Madison's first modern industrial concerns.

One of the finest remaining examples of this industrial past is the six-story brick building constructed for the Bader State Shoe company, organized in Milwaukee in 1893 by Albert and Henry Atkins. In 19000 the company opened a new factory on Madison's south side, at 1335 Gilson Street. It remained there until 1910 when company operations in Milwaukee and in Madison were consolidated under one roof at the new factory on Blount Street. Designed by noted Madison architect Ferdinand Kronenberg, this new factory was considered a model of its kind. It is also an excellent example of the simple dignity that such utilitarian buildings could achieve. At its peak the factory employed 250 people who made over 2000 pairs of shoes a day. Production continued until 1930 after which the building was used as a warehouse until its recent conversion into residential use.

Designated August 7, 1989
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#90: Italian Workmen's Club
914 Regent Street
1922/1936

One of the few buildings remaining from the original Italian community in Greenbush, the Italian Workmen's Club was constructed by volunteer labor in 1922, with a major renovation in 1936. John Icke, local contractor and benefactor of the Italian community, assisted in the construction. The Club was founded in 1912 as a mutual benefit society for Madison's Italian families. The Club, still thriving, provided health and life benefits to its members, along with social activities such as the annual "Festa Italia."

Designated April 16, 1990
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#91: La Follette House
314 S. Broom Street
1854

"Fighting Bob" La Follette and his wife Belle Case La Follette moved into this dignified old residence in 1881. Both graduated from the UW Law School, Belle being the first woman to do so. Both became preeminent state and national political figures, using their oratorical prowess to campaign against corruption and special privilege, and in favor of the new Progressive party, peace and woman's suffrage. "Fighting Bob" later served as U. S. congressman, governor, U. S. senator and candidate for President.

Designated April 16, 1990
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#92: Edna Taylor Conservancy Mounds
802 Femrite Drive
700 - 1200 A.D.

Six linear mounds and one panther effigy are located on a high glacial drumlin along the eastern side of the Edna Taylor Conservancy. Originally another linear mound followed the hill crest to the north of the existing group and a conical mound and another very long linear mound extended to the south. Wisconsin has the highest concentration of effigy mounds in the United States and the Madison area has one of the highest concentration of effigy mounds remaining. Most mounds were lost to 19th century agricultural practices and city development. The mound builders were farmers who also engaged in hunting and gathering. They lived in small villages and migrated from one to another based on the seasonal availability of natural resources. The mounds often, but not always, have burials associated with them, but their exact purpose is not entirely understood. Mounds tend to have been built in places with beautiful views of the surrounding countryside. The mounds are considered sacred by modern Native Americans and should be treated with respect.

Designated May 7, 1990
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#93: Hudson Park Mound
corner Hudson and Lakeland
700-1200 A.D.

Overlooking Lake Monona is a long tailed effigy mound that has been referred to as a turtle, lizard, panther and water spirit. Part of the tail was cut off when Lakeland Avenue was constructed. This mound was originally part of a dense and extensive cluster of mounds that extended from the Yahara River to what is now Olbrich Park. The site was still a favored Ho-Chunk campground as late as the late 19th century.

Wisconsin has the highest concentration of effigy mounds in the United States and the Madison area has one of the highest concentration of effigy mounds remaining. Most mounds were lost to 19th century agricultural practices and city development. The mound builders were farmers who also engaged in hunting and gathering. They lived in small villages and migrated from one to another based on the seasonal availability of natural resources. The mounds often, but not always, have burials associated with them, but their exact purpose is not entirely understood. Mounds tend to have been built in places with beautiful views of the surrounding countryside. The mounds are considered sacred by modern Native Americans and should be treated with respect.

Designated May 7, 1990
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#94: Elmside Park Mounds
corner Maple and Lakeland
700 - 1200 A.D.

Overlooking Lake Monona are two well-preserved animal effigies. Referred to for many years as a lynx and a bear, the actual animals or spirits that they were intended to represent is not entirely clear. These mounds were originally part of the same cluster as the Hudson Park mound.

Wisconsin has the highest concentration of effigy mounds in the United States and the Madison area has one of the highest concentration of effigy mounds remaining. Most mounds were lost to 19th century agricultural practices and city development. The mound builders were farmers who also engaged in hunting and gathering. They lived in small villages and migrated from one to another based on the seasonal availability of natural resources. The mounds often, but not always, have burials associated with them, but their exact purpose is not entirely understood. Mounds tend to have been built in places with beautiful views of the surrounding countryside. The mounds are considered sacred by modern Native Americans and should be treated with respect.

Designated May 7, 1990
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#95: Vilas Park Mound Group
702 S. Randall Avenue
700 - 1200 A.D.

Overlooking the zoo at the corner of Erin and Wingra Streets is an Indian mound group consisting of a bird effigy, a linear and six conicals. Two additional conical mounds and another bird were destroyed long ago. Most of Vilas Park was originally a marsh, providing a bounty of fish, birds small game and wild rice to the mound builders.

Wisconsin has the highest concentration of effigy mounds in the United States and the Madison area has one of the highest concentration of effigy mounds remaining. Most mounds were lost to 19th century agricultural practices and city development. The mound builders were farmers who also engaged in hunting and gathering. They lived in small villages and migrated from one to another based on the seasonal availability of natural resources. The mounds often, but not always, have burials associated with them, but their exact purpose is not entirely understood. Mounds tend to have been built in places with beautiful views of the surrounding countryside. The mounds are considered sacred by modern Native Americans and should be treated with respect.

Designated May 7, 1990
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#96: Hill Grocery and Thomas Residence
120 N. Blount Street and 649 E. Dayton Street
ca. 1850; moved 1901 and 1912

The two vernacular buildings on this site represent one of the last vestiges of Madison's first African-American community. The two-story commercial building was moved here in 1901 by African-American civic leader, John Turner, to provide a meeting place for the Douglass Beneficial Society. The house was moved here in 1912 to serve as living quarters for the pastor of the nearby St. Paul A.M.E. Church. John W. Hill purchased the property in 1917 and operated a grocery store here until around 1980.

Designated July 16, 1991
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#97: Henry C. and Minnie R. Wolff House
6 S. Prospect Avenue
1909
Alvan Small, architect

The Wolff House is an excellent example of Prairie School architecture adapted to the compact form of a medium-sized house. Madison architect Alvan Small designed the house in an unusual cruciform plan. The symmetrical design, with its central, two-story pavilion flanked by one-story porches, gives it an imposing formality and monumentality not present in most of Small's other designs. The house was built for Henry Wolff, a professor of mathematics at the University of Wisconsin, and his wife Minnie.

Designated October 21, 1991
Landmark Nomination Form


#98: American Tobacco Company Warehouses
651 W. Doty Street
1899 and 1900

These two buildings are the most substantial warehouses built in Madison to house the processing of leaf tobacco. From the Civil War until the 1940s, leaf tobacco was among Dane County's most lucrative crops. The tobacco grown in Wisconsin was typically used for cigar wrappers, cigar smoking being a hugely popular men's pastime before cigarettes eclipsed cigars after WW I. In their heyday over 350 men, boys, women and girls worked in these two buildings during the six month winter season.

Designated March 2, 1992
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#99: Baskerville Apartments
121-129 S. Hamilton Street
1913-1914

The Baskerville Apartments is one of Madison's finest remaining early apartment houses, built in an era of population explosion caused by the growth of the University of Wisconsin, state government and private industry. Downtown densities increased dramatically during this period before popular use of the automobile made the suburbs accessible to the lower and middle classes. The Baskerville is one of the best works of local architect Robert L. Wright, known also for his design of the old City Market.

Designated April 20, 1992
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#100: Anna and Cornelius Collins House
646 E. Gorham Street
1908
Claude and Starck, architects

Built for Anna and Cornelius Collins, spouses and partners in the Collins Brothers Lumber Company, this house embodies the eclecticism popular in the early decades of the twentieth century. Prolific Madison architects Louis Claude and Edward Starck brought together features of the Prairie style, Tudor Revival, and American Craftsman. It is also representative of the type of house chosen by and designed for Madison's business elite just after the turn of the twentieth century.

Designated February 1, 1993
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#101: Irene and Robert Connor House
640 E. Gorham Street
1920

This Colonial Revival house features an interesting floor plan: the stairs to the second floor are immediately in front of the main entrance, similar to many of the old Colonial houses on Cape Cod. The house was built for Irene Connor, daughter of Anna and Cornelius Collins who lived next door at 646 E. Gorham, and her husband Robert Connor. When Anna Collins died, her daughter Irene took over the vice-presidency of the family's lumber concern. The Collins/Connor houses at 640, 646 and 704 E. Gorham St. represent a pattern of family living that was common in Madison around the turn of the twentieth century.

Designated February 1, 1993
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#102: Longfellow School
210 S. Brooks Street
1918, 1924 and 1938
Law, Law and Potter, architects

Longfellow School presents a unified appearance despite its being designed and built in three phases. It was built in the formal brick subtype of the Tudor Revival, sometimes called the Elizabethan Revival. The elementary school served the ethnically diverse Greenbush neighborhood for many years. In the early 1960s the national urban renewal program, adopted in many U.S. cities, dislocated a large section of the neighborhood and enrollment declined. The school closed in 1980.

Designated July 26, 1993
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#103: Smith and Lamb Block
105 W. Main Street
1876
D. R. Jones, architect

When attorneys George Smith and Francis Lamb announced plans for their new block, the newspaper said it would have "a novel and attractive appearance." The building was designed in the unusual High Victorian Gothic style, which featured medieval arches and two-toned brickwork. The only other building in this style in Madison is Music Hall on the UW campus, also designed by D. R. Jones. Over the years many prominent attorneys have had their offices in this building.

Designated September 13, 1993
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#104: Edgewood College Mound Group
855 Woodrow Street
700-1200 A.D.

On the grounds of Edgewood College are twelve Indian mounds overlooking Lake Wingra. The Ho-Chunk used Lake Wingra as an abundant food source well after Euro-Americans began settling in the area. Along Edgewood Drive, which runs along the lakeshore, are several conical mounds and the top of a linear mound. Between Edgewood Drive and the library are two remnants of a linear mound. On the other side of the library near Woodrow Street is a large bird effigy. Two more conical mounds remain along a path to the north of the Edgewood Campus Grad School playground.

Wisconsin has the highest concentration of effigy mounds in the United States and the Madison area has one of the highest concentration of effigy mounds remaining. Most mounds were lost to 19th century agricultural practices and city development. The mound builders were farmers who also engaged in hunting and gathering. They lived in small villages and migrated from one to another based on the seasonal availability of natural resources. The mounds often, but not always, have burials associated with them, but their exact purpose is not entirely understood. Mounds tend to have been built in places with beautiful views of the surrounding countryside. The mounds are considered sacred by modern Native Americans and should be treated with respect.

Designated September 13, 1993
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#105: Halvorson Mound Group
5395 Yahara River Road, Yahara Heights Park
700 - 1200 A.D.

First recorded in 1911 as a group of five mounds, this group currently consists of three effigy mounds: a panther, a bear, and an oval mound. Wisconsin has the highest concentration of effigy mounds in the United States and the Madison area has one of the highest concentration of effigy mounds remaining. Most mounds were lost to 19th century agricultural practices and city development. The mound builders were farmers who also engaged in hunting and gathering. They lived in small villages and migrated from one to another based on the seasonal availability of natural resources. The mounds often, but not always, have burials associated with them, but their exact purpose is not entirely understood. Mounds tend to have been built in places with beautiful views of the surrounding countryside. The mounds are considered sacred by modern Native Americans and should be treated with respect.

Designated September 9, 1993
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#106: Spring Harbor Mound Group
1110 Spring Harbor Drive, 1775 Norman Way and 5388 University Avenue
700 - 1200 A.D.

First recorded in 1888 as a group of four to six mounds, this group currently consists of two mounds: a bear and a linear mound. Wisconsin has the highest concentration of effigy mounds in the United States and the Madison area has one of the highest concentration of effigy mounds remaining. Most mounds were lost to 19th century agricultural practices and city development. The mound builders were farmers who also engaged in hunting and gathering. They lived in small villages and migrated from one to another based on the seasonal availability of natural resources. The mounds often, but not always, have burials associated with them, but their exact purpose is not entirely understood. Mounds tend to have been built in places with beautiful views of the surrounding countryside. The mounds are considered sacred by modern Native Americans and should be treated with respect.

Designated January 10, 1994
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#107: Cardinal Hotel
416 E. Wilson Street
1908
Ferdinand Kronenberg, architect

Built directly across Wilson Street from the Milwaukee and Chicago Railroad depot and a block away from the Chicago and Northwestern depot, both of which stimulated the development of the area with their construction in the 1860s, the Cardinal Hotel was the last and the largest of Madison's railroad hotels. It is a good example of neo-classical design, in transition from Victorian to the Craftsman style. Kronenberg, a local architect and German immigrant, designed the original building with three stories. Two additional stories were built the following year. The hotel opened in 1908.

Designated October 25, 1993
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#108: Madison Masonic Temple
301 Wisconsin Avenue
1923-1925
Law and Law, architects

The Madison Masonic Temple is the best remaining example of a fraternal clubhouse in Madison. Masonic organizations were the most prominent fraternal groups in the city. Designed by the local architects James and Edward Law, brothers and Masons themselves, the building is an elegant example of Neo-Classical architecture. It was built in two sections: the front section that faces Wisconsin Avenue houses informal gathering spaces, and the rear section consists mostly of the large formal auditorium space.

Designated October 25, 1993
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#109: Belmont Hotel
101 E. Mifflin Street
Balch and Lippert, Architects

The Belmont Hotel was built to serve business travelers and legislators, with two dining rooms and "modern facilities," meaning adjacent bathrooms. City boosters hoped that it would encourage conventions to come to Madison. The construction of the eleven-story Belmont spurred the state legislature to pass a law, still on the books, that buildings within one mile of the state capitol could be no higher than the base of the capitol dome. The Belmont was sold to the YWCA in 1968.

Designated October 25, 1993
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#110: Nichols Station
427 E. Gorham Street
1917
Balch and Lippert, architects

Nichols Station, also known as the Madison Water Works, played an important role in the development of Madison's water supply system, and retains one of its original twin Allis-Chalmers steam-driven pumping engines. Engineers for the construction of the station faced the challenge of constructing the building around and eventually enclosing the still-operating old pumping station. The station continued operation until 1976. The design of the pumping station reflects the influence of the Prairie School of architecture, uncommon in utilitarian structures. Design details of this main station were used in most of the smaller stations that sprung up around the city as Madison grew.

Designated October 25, 1993
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#111: Thompson's Block
119 E. Main Street
1868

The Thompson Block is a good local example of a commercial building in the Italianate style. Its unknown designer employed structural and decorative cast-iron elements in the block's ground-floor storefront, and Milwaukee cream brick on the upper stories. The building is one of the few remaining structures of Madison's early commercial district. It was built for Norwegian entrepreneur, Ole Thompson, and was occupied by various retail grocery businesses until the 1930s, when it was converted to a tavern.

Designated October 25, 1993
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#112: Wakeley-Giles Building
117-119 E. Mifflin Street
ca. 1869

Originally built as a frame residence, in the early 1900s this building was clad in brick and turned into a commercial building. From ca. 1911 to 1922 it was the offices and printing plant for Rasmus B. Anderson's Amerika, a Norwegian language newspaper that was a political force in the Norwegian-American community from its founding in 1898 until Anderson's retirement in 1922. Previously, Anderson was the first Scandinavian studies professor in the U.S. and served as ambassador to Denmark.

Designated October 25, 1993
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#113: Quisling Towers Apartments
1 E. Gilman Street
1937
Lawrence Monberg, architect
Quisling Towers Apartments and the Quisling Clinic near-by are Madison's best examples of the Art Moderne style. The Quisling Apartments was designed by Danish-born architect Lawrence Monberg for Dr. Abraham Quisling, just before Monberg opened his own office in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Monberg was given full control over the details and execution of his design, which was considered bold in the context of Depression-era construction. The building was one of Madison's more prestigious apartment buildings, and still serves its original residential purpose.

Designated October 25, 1993
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#114: Herbert and Catherine Jacobs II House
3995 Shawn Trail
1943-1948
Frank Lloyd Wright, architect

This is the second house designed for Herbert and Catherine Jacobs by Wisconsin architect Frank Lloyd Wright. The house is the first of a type that Wright called the "Solar Hemicycle." Subsequent examples were built in Galesburg, MI; Bethesda, MD; and Tallahassee, FL. These houses employed many of the principles of his earlier Usonian houses. Their semicircular design was intended to take maximum advantage of the sun's path throughout the day. The Jacobs family was also the client for the first of Wright's Usonian houses. The Jacobs II house is a designed National Historic Landmark.

Designated October 25, 1993
National Historic Landmark
Landmark Nomination Form


#115: Merrill Springs Mound Group II Archaeological District
5030, 5034, 5040, 5042, 5046, 5053 and 5101 Lake Mendota Drive
ca. 700 - 1200 A.D.

This mound group is one of four distinct groupings in the historic Merrill Springs resort area along the shore of Lake Mendota. This group originally consisted of 13-20 mounds; today only six remain intact, with possible remnants of two others. Linear, conical and bear effigy mounds are interspersed among modern buildings and roads. Wisconsin has the highest concentration of effigy mounds in the United States and the Madison area has one of the highest concentration of effigy mounds remaining. Most mounds were lost to 19th century agricultural practices and city development. The mound builders were farmers who also engaged in hunting and gathering. They lived in small villages and migrated from one to another based on the seasonal availability of natural resources. The mounds often, but not always, have burials associated with them, but their exact purpose is not entirely understood. Mounds tend to have been built in places with beautiful views of the surrounding countryside. The mounds are considered sacred by modern Native Americans and should be treated with respect.

Designated January 10, 1994
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#116: Madison Club
5 E. Wilson Street
1916-1918
Frank Riley, architect

The Madison Club was founded in 1909 by business and professional men as a place where they could eat together and discuss the issues of the day. When they decided to erect their own clubhouse, they hired Frank Riley, a young architect who would become Madison's finest designer in the period revival styles. Besides dining rooms, the new Georgian Revival clubhouse also had hotel-style rooms and even "bachelor apartments." Women were invited to hold full membership in the 1970s.

Designated February 21, 1994
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#117: Garver Feed and Supply Co.
3244 Atwood Avenue
1906

This large industrial complex was originally built as the United States Sugar Co. sugar beet factory. When it was built, it was reputed to be the largest factory ever built in the state. The small brick building in front was the company offices. In 1912 the government removed sugar cane tariffs, causing a quick decline of the beet sugar industry, which was more expensive to produce. The company closed for a while, reopened during World War I and finally closed for good in 1924. During its operation, the factory was one of the largest employers in Madison. When the Garver Feed and Supply Co. took over the building in 1929, the upper two stories of the building were demolished. The feed mill operated in the building until the early 1990s, during which it was a major service provider for the Dane County agricultural industry.

Designated March 7, 1994
Landmark Nomination Form


# 118: Chi Phi Fraternity House
610 N. Henry Street
1928
Law, Law and Potter, architects

Constructed of Madison's native sandstone, the Chi Phi Fraternity House is an outstanding example of the Tudor Revival style. The handsome building is one of the most accomplished works of the local architectural firm of Law, Law and Potter who designed several of the Greek Society houses on Langdon St. The Chi Phi fraternity is the nation's oldest social fraternity. Founded on the UW campus in 1912 as the Red Triangles Society, Wisconsin's Kappa of Chi Phi Chapter was chartered in 1915.

Designated March 17, 1994
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#119: Mohr/Christoffer Block
115 W. Main Street
1873

The first occupants of this building were the Park Bakery and Restaurant on the left and the furniture and undertaking establishment of H. C. Christopher and partners on the right. From 1898 to 1909 the upper stories housed the offices of the American Thresherman, a farming magazine with a national distribution. After 1909 the same space housed "Fighting Bob" and Belle Case La Follette's La Follette's Weekly, a nationally known progressive journal that after his death became known as the Progressive magazine.

Designated July 11, 1994
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#120: McGovern Block
121 W. Main Street
1871; remodeled 1936

The McGovern store building, originally constructed as a standard Italianate commercial building in 1871, was modernized in 1936 and converted from a retail grocery store to a printing office. It remains an excellent example of a terra cotta, Art Deco commercial storefront from that period. It is one of the few Art Deco designs in Madison, one of the few buildings with a terra cotta façade, and the only one to combine both.

Designated July 1, 1994
Landmark Nomination Form


#121: Madison Catholic Assn. Clubhouse
15 E. Wilson Street
1938
John J. Flad, architect

This Mediterranean Revival clubhouse has Art Moderne touches, reflecting its late 1930s date. It was built for the Knights of Columbus, a fraternal society for Catholic men. Several other Catholic groups met here and the building also housed the offices of the Catholic Diocese. John J. Flad was a prominent Catholic layman who designed many buildings for the Catholic church. John J. Flad and Associates would grow to become one of the largest architectural firms in the city.

Designated August 22, 1994
Landmark Nomination Form


#122: Terrace Homes Apartments
114-118 N. Breese Terrace
1927-1928
Philip M. Homer, architect

Terrace Homes apartments is the first documented example of cooperative home ownership in Madison. Popular in larger cities, the cooperative movement was the precursor of condominium ownership. This imposing and substantial Tudor Revival style building is one of the finest designs of local architect Philip M. Homer. Homer and his wife Gladys were among the original residents of the building. They lived here for more than 60 years.

Designated January 9, 1995
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#123: Leonard House
2015 Adams Street
1915
Eugene Marks, architect

Built for poet, playwright and UW English professor William Ellery Leonard, this house is representative of the Craftsman style, of which Madison has many fine residential examples. The house features the grouped windows, overhanging eaves, exposed beams and horizontal accents that typify the style. The interior has extensive oak woodwork and an open plan. Leonard lived in the house with his second wife Charlotte Charlton during his most productive years (1915-1926), and described the house fondly in his autobiography.

Designated April 7, 1995
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#124: Eggiman House
857 South Shore Drive
1936-1937
Robert W. McLaughlin, Jr., American Homes

The Eggiman House is Wisconsin's only "Motohome," a low-cost, prefabricated house manufactured of mostly metal and marketed and sold by American Homes, Inc. The Motohome, manufactured and built from 1932 to 1937, is one of the most important examples of the attempt to industrialize and economize the production of housing during the Great Depression. Only about 100-150 were ever sold due to public resistance to Modern architecture and metal construction. The Eggiman House departs from the standard Motohome specifications in that it was built with a basement.

Designated April 17, 1995
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#125: Tenney Park
1440 E. Johnson Street
1899-1910
Ossian Cole Simonds, landscape architect

Originally 14 acres of marshland, this parcel was purchased in 1899 by the Madison Park and Pleasure Drive Association with a grant of $4,000 from Madison attorney, Daniel K. Tenney. The MPPDA hired Ossian Cole Simonds, a landscape architect, to design a park on the site, intended to serve the families of working men and women who lived near the shops and factories on the isthmus. The park has been expanded and its plan altered several times, but the lagoon and island were part of Simonds' original plan.

Designated July 10, 1995
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#126: Yahara River Parkway
501 S. Thornton Avenue
1903 - 1906

The Yahara River Parkway was designed by noted landscape architect O. C. Simonds of Chicago. At the time it was at the eastern edge of the City. When European-Americans first settled here, the Yahara River meandered through marshland between Lakes Mendota and Monona. It had been canalized for use by the mills at the northern end of the river, and was used as an informal trash dump for decades.

The parkway was developed by the Madison Parks and Pleasure Drive Association, a group of private citizens who worked tirelessly at the turn of the last century to provide parks and scenic drives for the benefit of the citizens of Madison. The Yahara River Parkway was the first park funded by donations from Madisonians rather than large gifts from a few donors. The design of the parkway is an excellent and intact example of the Prairie School of landscape architecture, a design theory that honored the native landscapes of the Midwest and paralleled the Prairie School of architecture

Designated July 10, 1995
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#127: Willett S. Main Building
101-105 State Street
1855-1856
Stephen V. Shipman, architect

This Italianate building is constructed of locally-quarried sandstone blocks, and features a decorative wood cornice with brackets and dentils. It is one of several imposing flatiron buildings at the cardinal corners of the capitol square, and one of the first commercial buildings to be built west of the Capitol. Main daringly chose the site for his dry goods business when the bulk of commercial activity was at the opposite corner of the square. It is the oldest surviving commercial building on the capitol square.

Designated July 10, 1995
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#128: Hotel Washington
636 W. Washington Avenue
1906

The Hotel Washington was destroyed by fire in 1996.
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#129: Wisconsin State Capitol and Capitol Park Grounds
1906-1917
George Brown Post and Sons, architects

The present State Capitol building is the third built on this site. The first, begun in 1837 and completed in 1848, outlived its usefulness and was demolished around 1862, and the second, built shortly thereafter, burned in 1904. This building, built in five phases over eleven years, is a masterpiece of Renaissance Revival architecture as interpreted through American Beaux-Arts sensibilities. Post's cruciform plan with a dome at the crossing may be described as a Greek Cross or a St. Andrew's Cross The Corinthian colonnades above the entrances at the end of each of the four wings carry traditional classical entablatures and pediments, which feature sculptures also arranged in a classical manner, conveying themes particular to Wisconsin. The four wings are identically designed and correspond to the cardinal compass directions. The massive granite dome was completed in 1915, and remains the only granite dome in the United States. It was intentionally designed to be a few inches lower than the dome on the U.S. Capitol building in Washington D.C. The Capitol is a designated a National Historic Landmark.

Designated July 24, 1995
National Historic Landmark
Landmark Nomination Form


#130: Hoyt Park
3902 Regent Street
ca. 1934-1936
A. F. Nerlinger, architect

Hoyt Park was created from a City-owned sandstone quarry, and the buildings were likely built with stone quarried on the site. The main shelter is the largest of several structures in the park built by federal Civil Works Administration workers during the Great Depression, many of them jobless Italian stone masons from the nearby Greenbush neighborhood. Designed by A.F. Nerlinger, the shelter was built in a simple rustic style.

Designated October 2, 1995
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#131: Sixth Ward Public Library
1249 Williamson Street
1913
Claude and Starck, architects

This building was the first branch public library in Madison, and is the oldest surviving library building in the city. It is one of 63 libraries in Wisconsin built with funds donated by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. It consists of two sections: an entry and a main library block. Its brick construction with stone detailing, pointed arches and vertical piers, suggestive of buttresses, are evocative of the Collegiate Gothic style, popular in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Designated October 2, 1995
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#132: Breese Stevens Field
917 E. Mifflin Street
1925
Claude and Starck, architects

This athletic facility was built on a block sold to the City of Madison in 1923 by the widow of former Madison Mayor Breese J. Stevens. The City hired local architects Claude and Starck to design a stadium for the new field in 1925. The stone walls were constructed in 1934 by the federal Civil Works Administration, the same year lighting towers were erected. During its early years the field was used for most outdoor high school athletic events and for minor league baseball. In 1982 a rehabilitation project converted it to a soccer facility.

Designated October 16, 1995
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#133: Majestic Theater
115 King Street
1906
Claude and Starck, architects

Originally built for Vaudeville stage shows, the Majestic underwent many changes as it adjusted to trends in the entertainment industry. The theater put on its last Vaudeville show in 1912 to take advantage of the increasing popularity of movies. The theater operated under many owners - all working to keep up with changes in entertainment and to compete with larger movie palaces, television and multiplex cinemas. Claude and Starck's use of classical features here is light and informal.

Designated October 16, 1995
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#134: Burrows Block
120-128 S. Pinckney Street
1856

The Burrows Block was demolished ca. 1996 and replaced with a new structure that is almost a complete replica of the original appearance of the old Opera House block, which in the 1880s became known as the Burrows Block.

Landmark Nomination Form


#135: Smith-Ogg House
1711 Kendall Avenue
1896

One of the first houses in University Heights, this imposing house was built for Charles Forster Smith, a professor of Greek and Classical Philology. In 1917 Smith sold the house to Emma and Frederick Ogg, a professor who is generally considered to be one of the founders of political science. Until his death in 1951 most of the rooms in this house were used as studies - each with its own projects in progress. The house is an excellent example of the transition from exuberant Victorian style to the classical Georgian Revival.

Designated May 6, 1996
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#136: August C. and Della E. Larson House
1006 Grant Street
1911
Claude and Starck, architects

This house embodies many of the signature elements and details of Claude and Starck's Prairie style designs. The house features the wide overhanging eaves typical of the style, as well as a double string course on the second floor, and leaded glass casement windows. The contrasting red brick and cream stucco are also typical of several of Claude and Starck's designs. August Larson was the director of the Wisconsin agency of the Central Life Insurance Co., and later the president of the Randall Bank.

Designated July 15, 1996
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#137: Dick-Eddy Blocks
106 E. Doty Street
1889 and 1907
Conover and Porter, architects

The imposing Dick Building is a flat-iron building in the Richardsonian Romanesque style, a style in which the local architects, Conover and Porter, were particularly adept. The Dick block was built in part to house Christian Dick's wine and liquor wholesale business. It also housed the Schlitz saloon, Prof. Kehl's Dance Academy and offices. The Eddy building next door was built by E. W. Eddy to house his "One Minute Lunch Room," a popular inexpensive eatery.

Designated October 20, 1998
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#138: Orpheum Theater
216 State Street
1925-1927
Rapp and Rapp, Chicago, architects

The Orpheum Theater is the most intact and finest remaining example of the movie palace in Madison. It was one of the two grand movie palaces built in downtown Madison during the heyday of motion picture entertainment, the period of opulent theaters in which one movie mogul remarked "we sell tickets to theaters, not movies." Financed in part by dentist William Beecroft, also known locally as "Mr. Theater," it cost a whopping $750,000 to construct. Along with the Capitol Theater across the street, it was the venue for big name orchestras and stage stars, in addition to first run movies. Its French Renaissance interior made it one of the most beautiful public spaces in the city. The limestone exterior was built in the very fashionable Art Deco style, and the towering "Orpheum" sign is a visual landmark in downtown Madison.

Designated December 1, 1998
Landmark Nomination Form


#139: Yost's-Kessenich's Building
201 State Street
1923
Frank Riley, architect

This imposing French Renaissance style building was erected for Kessenich's Dry Goods store, which specialized in women's clothing. With the involvement of the Yost family, the business eventually became known as "Yosts," a name that many people remember it by today. The elegant materials, craftsmanship and design of the building were meant to convey the high quality of the goods inside. In 1940 it was said to be "one of the first large stores on State Street .. credited with being largely responsible for the business development of that thoroughfare." The façade of the building has been retained as part of the Overture complex.

Designated March 16, 1999
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#140: Washington Public Grade and Orthopedic School
545 W. Dayton Street
1939
John Flad, architect

This building was funded by the federal Public Works Administration during the Great Depression, and is a significant example of the Art Moderne style applied to an academic building. Rounded corners, concrete banding at the sill line, and a concrete water table produce the streamlined effect. Decorative metal window grilles with stylized chevrons and feather-like verticals complete the Art-Moderne design. This school replaced three older, smaller schools in the area, and specialized in serving children with disabilities, especially children who had been stricken with polio.

Designated March 30, 1999
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#141: Aldo Leopold House
2222 Van Hise Avenue
1923-1924

Aldo Leopold lived in this Craftsman style house from 1924 until his death in 1948. Leopold came to Madison to work at the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory and was a pioneer in forestry, wilderness preservation, soil conservation and wildlife ecology. Writer of "A Sand County Almanac," the classic text "Game Management" and over 350 other books and articles, Leopold has been called "probably the most quoted voice in the history of conservation."

Designated January 2, 2001
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#142: Madison Candy Company
744 Williamson Street
1903
John Nader, architect

This three-story brick commercial block, designed in a vernacular style, was built for the Madison Candy Company, which operated here until 1927. The building features red brick on the facade and Milwaukee cream brick on the sides and rear. The ground level façade was altered around 1950 when Williamson St. was widened. The Madison Candy Co. began operations in 1899 and was one of many small industries that emerged during Madison's small industrial boom which started in the early 1880s.

Designated January 2, 2001
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#143: Boutell House
4522 E. Buckeye Road
1923

The Boutell house is one of the best local examples of the Georgian Revival, a style that was immensely popular in Madison in the 1920s. The Georgian was the style of choice for most residential construction in America in the years before and after the American revolution.
Architects and builders renewed their interest in the style during the 1876 Centennial celebration; the style has been in fashion ever since. Originally part of the 80-acre Horstemeier farm, a daughter, Hilda, and her husband, Loyle, bought the site in 1923 for their new house.

Designated May 1, 2001
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#144: U. S. Post Office and Courthouse
215 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard
1927-1929
James Wetmore, architect

This impressive limestone building with its two-story Ionic colonnade is one of Madison's finest examples of the neo-classical revival style. Wetmore was acting supervising architect for the Department of the Treasury and this and similar designs were used in many medium-sized cities across the United States. This building replaced the former post office and courthouse (1870-1929) that was located across the Square at E. Mifflin St. and Wisconsin Ave.

Designated October 15, 2002
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#145: University Presbyterian Church and Student Center
731 State Street
1931-1935
Edward Tough, architect

Designed in the Neo-Gothic Revival style, this campus ministry church is veneered with Lannonstone and brick and features design elements of Tudor-Gothic. The Rev. Matthew C. Allison worked tirelessly to promote the Presbyterian campus ministry on the UW campus, which culminated in the construction of this church. Religious campus ministries emerged on state-supported college campuses in the early twentieth century as a response to the prohibition of religious instruction in state schools.

Designated October 15, 2002
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#146: Wisconsin Wagon Company Factory
602 Railroad Street
1903, 1911

The Wisconsin Wagon Co. built this utilitarian building in two phases. It served as a warehouse and space for constructing and finishing horse-drawn wagons. By 1917 the company had transitioned to the production of auto bodies. The building is associated with the transition from horse-drawn transportation to the automobile. It is also an excellent example of a building type known as the "textile mill industrial loft" - a long, narrow, multi-story building with an open floor plan to accommodate industrial machinery.

Designated October 15, 2002
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#147: Madison Gas & Electric Co. Powerhouse
717 E. Main Street
1902 and 1915

The MG&E Powerhouse is a sprawling complex built in several phases from 1902 until 1988. Only the earliest sections, built in 1902 and 1915, exhibit Neo-Classical styling. Later additions are astylistic. The site where the powerhouse stands today was the site of the first gas company in the city, and the second in the state, organized in 1855. The MG&E powerhouse continues to function, in an excellent state of preservation and working condition, into the twenty-first century.

Designated October 15, 2002
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#148: Swedish Lutheran Gloria Dei Church
402 E. Mifflin Street
1922

This church was designed in the late Gothic Revival style by an unknown architect. The original section features pointed-arch windows, brick buttresses, and lead muntins in its windows, as well as a unique tapered tower with a stepped, Flemish-style parapet. The building was built for a Swedish Lutheran congregation and later served St. Paul's A.M.E. Church from 1965 until 1997. Local architect Grover Lippert designed the two-story Sunday School addition in 1957. In 1997 the building was converted to condominiums.

Designated October 15, 2002
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#149: Luther Memorial Chapel
626 University Avenue
1914-1915
Claude and Starck, architects

The Holy Trinity Lutheran Church of Madison commissioned this building as a chapel for UW students in 1914. Claude and Starck executed a small but excellent Elizabethan Revival design at a time when the firm was designing primarily in the Prairie School style. The building features Tudor-arched windows and entry, and full height, polygonal stone-clad pilasters derived from castellated and fortified houses of Tudor-period England. It was the first Lutheran church in Madison to conduct all of its services in English.

Designated October 15, 2002
Landmark Nomination Form


#150: Emily Thompson House
101 S. Franklin Street
ca. 1872

Emily Torstensenseim immigrated from Norway to the United States with her parents at the age of four. When she grew up she married a fellow Norwegian immigrant, Ole Thompson, who became a successful hotelier and grocer. Shortly after his death, his widow built this cream brick house for herself and her four children. It is a surviving and distinguished example of the smaller houses built in the first decades of Madison's history, many of which have been lost to the "march of progress."

Designated October 15, 2002
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#151: Philip Schoen Building
117 E. Main Street
1875
David R. Jones, architect

German immigrant Philip Schoen commissioned this building and operated his Capitol Bakery, Restaurant and Saloon here until 1885. The restaurant and saloon continued under new ownership until around 1940. It is an elegant nineteenth-century commercial building in the heart of the first commercial district in the city, which formed around the King St. corner of the square. The façade is clad in Madison sandstone blocks and the other elevations are in cream brick. The storefront features cast iron and a sandstone cornice.

Designated October 15, 2002
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#152: Mattermore-Malaney House
512 East Main Street
1875

This is a good example of a nineteenth-century front gable house, a simple vernacular form built with its gable end facing the street. Houses of this type were built in Wisconsin from the 1840s to the 1920s. This house is built on a wood frame, and features an off-center entrance, double-hung windows, and simple classical lines. Small frame residences like this are not typically as intact as this house, because they were fairly easy to alter and add onto over the years. James Malaney, a gas fitter with the Madison Gas Light and Coke Company, and his wife Theresa purchased the property in 1881 and lived there for several decades.

Designated October 15, 2002
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#153: King Street Arcade
107-113 King Street
1927
Charles Huart, architect

This is Madison's only example of a building type usually built in larger cities during this period. Its oddly shaped lot resulted in a five-sided building that presents two façades: one on Pinckney St. and one on King St. Typical of the commercial arcade, both façades feature a series of arches supported by columns. The building's interior space is organized around a court lined with small shops and offices and roofed with skylights. It was designed at a time when most Madisonians did their shopping downtown.

Designated October 15, 2002
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#154: Frederick and Sophia Festner House
126 South Hancock Street
1862

The Festner House is one the oldest houses remaining in downtown Madison. It is a brick version of a nineteenth-century front gable house, a simple vernacular form built with the gable end facing the street. This style was commonly built in Wisconsin between the 1840s and the 1920s. Most examples are typically small or medium in size. Though most front gables houses are simply decorated, this house features dentils and paired brackets, imparting an Italianate feel. Its porch was added in 1957.

Designated October 15, 2002
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#155: Draper Brothers Block
101 N. Hamilton Street
1867

This Madison sandstone business block was built for the Draper Brothers after fire destroyed a previous building on the site. From 1867 until ca. 1941, the storefront housed a meat market. For many years the market was run by Matthew Hoven, an alderman for 20 years and then three-term mayor (1897-1901), the first German-American and the first Catholic to be mayor. More recently the storefront housed the House of Wisconsin Cheese. Over 130 years later the building is still owned by the family that built it.

Designated October 15, 2002
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#156: Doty School
351 W. Wilson Street
1906
Claude and Starck, architects

Built during a population boom in Madison, Doty School replaced the smaller Fourth Ward School built on this site in 1866. When it opened, the new school was renamed for Madison's founder, James Duane Doty, the person responsible for Madison's selection as the state capital in 1836. Claude and Starck were prolific local architects who designed school houses across the state, as well as many of Madison's turn-of-the-century residences. The building was converted to condominiums in 1983.

Designated October 15, 2002
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#157: Argus Building
121 E. Main Street
ca. 1845, 1891

The Argus Building is probably the oldest surviving commercial building in Madison. It was built in the Greek Revival style. In 1891 it was expanded and given a Romanesque appearance. The expansion project replaced the original gable roof with a sloped roof hidden by a corbelled brick parapet, and replaced the ground floor façade with two cast-iron storefronts. The building has served as the home of the first newspaper published in Madison and the first Masonic Lodge organized in Madison.

Designated October 15, 2002
Landmark Nomination Form


#158: Dowling Apartments
445 W. Wilson Street
1922
Philip Dean, architect

William and Margaret Dowling built this impeccably maintained Craftsman style apartment building. It included luxury amenities such as chandeliers and built-in breakfronts in the dining rooms, laundry service and a dumb waiter system. Margaret Dowling, who lived here until her death in 1962, was a tireless advocate for the well being of institutionalized, elderly, immigrant and poor people, through her service on local, state and national Catholic and social welfare organizations.

Designated October 15, 2002
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form


#159: Hotel Loraine
123 W. Washington Avenue
1923-1925
Herbert W. Tullgren

The Hotel Loraine was Madison's premier hotel from 1924 until 1968, when its gradual conversion to an office building began. When it was built, the Loraine was the most expensive commercial construction project that the city had ever seen, at $1.1 million. Built in an eclectic style blending Mediterranean design elements with Gothic-derived decorative elements, the composition of the two principle facades is classical, with a two-story base, six-story midsection and two-story terminal section.

Designated October 25, 2002
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#160: Louis and Catherine Nelson House
504 E. Main Street
1881

The Nelson House is a brick version of a nineteenth-century front gable house, a simple vernacular form built on a rectangular plan with its gable end facing the street. This type was commonly built in Wisconsin between the 1840s and the 1920s. Examples are usually small or medium in size. Front gable houses were typically built by working families and are simply decorated. This quite intact house features a simple cornice, a stone water table, and an oculus window in the front gable end.

Designated October 15, 2002
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#161: Timothy and Catherine McCarthy House
848 Jenifer Street
1897
Conover and Porter

This house embodies the distinctive characteristics of Queen Anne architecture: a steeply pitched hipped roof, cross gables, an asymmetric design and textured surfaces. American versions like this one often include Colonial ornamentation like capped windows and broken pediments. It is an excellent residential example of the teamwork of master builder Timothy McCarthy and master architects Conover and Porter during the height of their careers and the height of the popularity of the Queen Anne style.

Designated September 7, 2004
National Register of Historic Places
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#162: Gisholt Machine Company Manufacturing Complex
1245-1301 E. Washington Avenue
1899-1901, 1911, 1946

The Gisholt complex consists of three buildings representing different stages of the company's development. They feature an eclectic mix of Classical and Craftsman elements. The large factory building is the oldest section of the complex and employs the latest structural methods of its day for industrial buildings. The Gisholt Machine Company, founded in 1885 by Norwegian immigrant John A. Johnson, became a significant employer and played a crucial role in the development of Madison's east side.

Designated September 7, 2004
Landmark Nomination Form


#163: Fuller & Johnson Manufacturing Company Office Building
1344 E. Washington Avenue
1885, 1892, 1909

This relatively small office building is all that remains intact of the once sprawling Fuller & Johnson Manufacturing Company. It was built largely in an industrial vernacular mode but features a classically styled main entrance. Most of the former complex was located across Dickinson St. from this site. One of its founders, John A. Johnson, also started the Gisholt Machine Co. on E. Washington Ave., and was a powerful catalyst for turning Madison into an important manufacturing center in the 1880s.

Designated September 7, 2004
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#164: Woman's Building
240 W. Gilman Street
1906
Jeremiah K. Cady

The Woman's Building was built for the Woman's Club of Madison. Organized in 1893, the Club was the local manifestation of a nationwide women's movement during the Progressive Era. Not yet having the power to vote, women across the country organized Woman's Clubs to exercise their influence on local government. The Madison women's club had dramatic effects on local health and public safety issues, and was eventually able to establish a philanthropic committee to support local cultural programs.

Designated September 21, 2004
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#165: Suhr Building
102-104 King Street
1885-1887
Captain John Nader

This flatiron building was designed in the Italianate style at a time when the style was declining in popularity. The architect chose the style so that the building would blend well with its older neighbors. The Suhr Building's main features represent the style's most common expressions, including square window moldings, ogee brackets and symmetry. The original dentils under its cornice are not extant. The building was built for the German Bank, founded in 1887 by German immigrant, John J. Suhr. The bank helped the city remain stable during economic downturns such as the Great Depression.

Designated April 19, 2005
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#166: Castle and Doyle Building
125 State Street
1856/1921
1856 Original Architect: Stephen Vaughn Shipman
1921 Alterations: Claude and Starck

Originally built as Madison Fire Engine Company #2, this horse-drawn firefighting company building was a good example of nineteenth century civic architecture. Madison Company #2 was made up of nearly 70 German men, and was located here until 1866-1970 when it was reorganized and moved to a different location as the Andrew Proudfit Steam Fire Co #2. The Building was sold to the Castle and Doyle Fuel Company in 1920. The Castle and Doyle Fuel Co hired Claude and Starck Architects in 1921 to redesign the State Street storefront façade. The 1921 redesign re-faced the building in a Neo-classical Revival style with glazed architectural terra-cotta tiles that featured a low-relief Neo-classical urn and foliage pattern in green and white. The façade design also includes a prism glass transom with a terra cotta “Castle & Doyle” and “coal” signs above it. This building is a rare local example of the use of glazed architectural terra cotta tile.

Madison Landmark Designation: January 7, 1974
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#167: University of Wisconsin Dairy Barn
1915 Linden Drive
1898 / 1909
1898 Architect: J.T.W. Jennings
1909 Additions: State Architect, Arthur Peabody
J.T.W. Jennings, an architect in private practices in Chicago, designed the original three-story, side-gambreled main barn, brick silo and two front-gambreled perpendicular livestock barns in a style that was inspired by the rural architecture of the Normandy region of France. A side milk-house and additional east end livestock barn were added in 1916-17 by the State Architect, Arthur Peabody, and designed to match the original section in finish and details.

The Dairy Barn played a significant role in the advancement of dairy science as the site of the “single-grain experiment” cattle feeding study performed by Stephen Babcock between 1907 and 1911. The experiment reached far beyond livestock, and laid the foundation for the emergence of the modern science of nutrition, leading to the discovery of vitamins and their importance in a healthy diet. The Dairy Barn also played a significant role in science for research, outreach projects and teaching demonstrations conducted between 1898 and 1951 which found discoveries that were applicable in other fields of breeding and health in livestock, including artificial insemination technology, testing and eventual eradication of bovine tuberculosis, identifying and controlling Johnes disease and milk fever.

Madison Landmark Designation: September 18, 2007
National Register of Historic Places: November 4, 1993
National Historic Landmark Designation: April 5, 2005
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#168: Davies House
428 N Livingston Street
1907
Architect: unknown
The Davies House is an example of Georgian Revival architecture that emulates the style and proportion of buildings built in England and its Colonies in the early 1700’s. The Davies house is one of the best examples of this turn-of-the-century Georgian Revival in the city of Madison, and remains largely intact.

Joseph Edward Davies was born in Watertown, 1876, and moved to Madison to attend the University of Wisconsin. After graduation from the Law School in 1901, Davies was made the temporary chairman of the Democratic State Convention in 1902. The same year, he married Emlen Knight, and soon started a law practice in Watertown known as Aylward, Davies, Olbrich and Hill. His political career evolved locally in Madison as a Lawyer, State Attorney General and Chairman of the State Democratic Central Committee. In 1911 he became actively involved in leadership of the Democratic Party that propelled Woodrow Wilson to presidential victory in 1912.

Davies was appointed Commissioner of Corporations by President Wilson in 1912, and was instrumental in the development of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Davies was appointed by Wilson as the first Chairman of the FTC in 1915. Davies’ political career continued to expand and included being the U.S. ambassador to both Russia (1937-38) and Belgium (1938-39) as well as many other diplomatic envoys abroad during World War II.

Madison Landmark Designation: July 18, 2006
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#169: University of Wisconsin Armory and Gymnasium
716 Langdon Street
1892-1894
Architect: Allan Conover and Lew Porter

The UW Armory and Gymnasium is a significant and outstanding example of its building type. The “castellated medieval fortress” variation of the Romanesque Revival marks it unquestionably as an armory, while the interior spaces and large open spans made it a state-of-the-art nineteenth century gymnasium. The Armory features a rusticated coursed sandstone ashlar foundation, and load-bearing brick walls in common bond with sandstone trim. Distinguishing features include stepped gables, turrets and towers with corbelled and crenellated battlements, and broad arched entryways on the south and west facades.

The UW Armory was the site of the 1904 Wisconsin Republican Convention, a seminal event in the history of the Progressive Movement. At this convention, Robert M. La Follette's Progressives defeated the Stalwarts for control of the Wisconsin Republican Party. Widespread favorable publicity launched La Follette on the national scene. The controversy and legal suit engendered by the "Gymnasium Convention" and La Follette's subsequent vindication by the Supreme Court of Wisconsin led the Progressives to victory that November, giving them a majority in the state legislature the following year. This allowed the enactment of substantial reforms, many of which were subsequently adopted by many states across the Nation.

Madison Landmark Designation: September 18, 2007
National Register of Historic Places: November 4, 1993
National Historic Landmark Designation: November 4, 1993
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#170: University of Wisconsin Science Hall
550 N Park Street
1885-1887
Architect: Henry C Koch, altered by Allan Conover

Science Hall is a three-story u-shaped Romanesque Revival structure with a gable roof, featuring a rock-faced coursed rhyolite ashlar raised basement and walls of red-pressed brick in common bond. The building is enriched with ornamental brickwork and belt courses of rhyolite and glazed red terra cotta.

Science Hall is associated with Charles R. Van Hise (1857-1918), who was the first geologist in the Nation to apply microscopic lithology to the extensive study of crystalline rocks, and to use those results in the formulation of geological principles. Van Hise's emphasis on the quantitative application of physical and chemical laws to geological problems was one of his greatest contributions to the science of geology. His influential 1904 monograph, A Treatise on Metamorphism, moved geology out of the science of classification and into formulating principles. As a teacher, Van Hise earned a reputation for training geologists who matched his own high standards in scientific research.

In addition, it was in Science Hall that Wisconsin Physics Professors Earle M. Terry and Edward Bennett, along with their students, carried out research that contributed to the development of radio from wireless telegraphy. In the basement of Science Hall, Terry and his students development the beginnings of telegraphic station 9XM, which eventually became WHA radio, the oldest continuously operating radio station in the nation.

Madison Landmark Designation: September 18, 2007
National Register of Historic Places: November 4, 1993
National Historic Landmark Designation: November 4, 1993
Landmark Nomination Form


#171: Madison East Side High School
2222 E Washington Avenue
1922 with several later additions
Architect: Frank Riley

This Collegiate Gothic Revival style school, building has several parts, of which only the main block of a ground floor and three upper levels is considered to be historically significant. The original block of the structure is dominated by a central stone entrance tower.

East Side High School represents a significant commitment by the City of Madison to its educational system. The high school is an excellent example of the Collegiate Gothic style of architecture and it one of architect Frank Riley’s finest works. Riley’s plans for the school were gradually implemented over a period of 15 years to accommodate a fast growing student population.

Madison Landmark Designation: September 18, 2007
Landmark Nomination Form


#172: Doris House
605 W Main Street
1857-1858
Architect: unknown

The Doris House is a two-story, side-gabled example of the Greek Revival style that was popular nationally and locally for civic and residential buildings from 1830-1860.

The Doris Hose is a remnant of the social development of the Bassett Neighborhood. Besides being one of the earliest homes built in the neighborhood, the Doris House is one of the few remaining examples of an Irish homestead whose owners opened their doors to visitors and residents of the growing Bassett Neighborhood. Railroad hotels and boarding houses, such as this, were once well represented in Madison but most of them are now gone. John Doris Sr. and his family built the family’s homestead two blocks from the west railroad depot, where inbound passenger and freight trains provided a steady stream of workers, visitors and immigrants. Between 1858 and 1973 Doris family members were associated with other hotels, boarding houses, saloons and grocery stores in the 4th ward. In 2002, the Doris House was renovated and became part of the 4th Ward Lofts development project.

Madison Landmark Designation: February 26, 2008
Landmark Nomination Form


#173: Schubert Building
120 W Mifflin Street
1908
Architect: Ferdinand Kronenberg

The Schubert Building is a brick commercial structure constructed in the Queen Anne style in 1908, and originally housed Andrew Schubert’s Silver Dollar Saloon and Restaurant, which closed during prohibition. The roofline is formed by a Flemish gable, and three simple ornamental plaques decorate the building’s front façade. The most notable element is the bay window in the second floor. Queen Anne buildings typically incorporate design elements from other styles. The Schubert Building includes a handsome leaded three-paneled glass transom above the storefront. The Schubert transom window is unique among remaining transom windows, and incorporates curving floral patterns with the stylization of the Arts and Crafts movement.

Madison Landmark Designation: February 26, 2008
Landmark Nomination Form


#174: Steinle Turret Machine Co.
149 Waubesa Street
1903; 1916-1918
Architect: unknown

The Steinle Turret Machine Company is a long, one-story, astylistic utilitarian building. The building is architecturally significant as a good example of the industrial building type called a “production shed.”
The period of significance extends from 1903 to 1942 encompassing the dates of construction of the original section and the four additions to the building. In 1940 the building was acquired by the Theodore Kupfer Iron Works. The Steinle building retains much of its historic integrity and was part of a significant restoration and rehabilitation project in which it has become the Goodman Community Center.

Madison Landmark Designation: April 22, 2008
National Register of Historic Places: December 13, 2007
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#175: Hobbins Block / Olson and Veerhusen Building
7-11 N Pinckney Street
1899 and 1906
Architect: Claude and Starck

The Hobbins Block is part of one of the few groupings of nineteenth and early twentieth century commercial buildings remaining on the Capitol Square. The block conveys a sense of what downtown Madison was like in the early twentieth century, when the city’s commercial center had become a sophisticated urban center. The Olson and Veerhusen Building, on its own, presents a good example of early twentieth century commercial architecture that typically displays a long rectangular footprint and narrow façade overlooking the street.

Madison Landmark Designation: April 22, 2008
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#176: Maeder Building / Ellsworth Block
21-23 N Pinckney Street
1871
Architect: unknown

The two-story, neo-classical revival sandstone Maeder Building at 21 N Pinckney Street and the three-story Italianate sandstone Ellsworth Block at 23-25 North Pinckney were each erected in 1871 and posses a gently sloping shed roof hidden behind ornamental parapets. Like the Hobbins Block, these two buildings help convey a sense of what downtown Madison was like in the early twentieth century, when the city’s commercial center had become a sophisticated urban center.

Madison Landmark Designation: April 22, 2008
Landmark Nomination Form

 

#177: Winterbotham Building
27 N Pinckney Street
1897
Architect

The Lydia Winterbotham Building is a three-story Richardsonian Romanesque style (style named after architect H.H. Richardson) building constructed of brick with a rock-faced, cast concrete block front façade. Although the façade has been altered, and lost its projecting two-story oriel on the second and third floors, the building retains much of its Richardsonian Romanesque flavor. Alteration of the storefront was typical of commercial buildings, and detracts minimally from the historic character of the Winterbotham Building. Like the other landmark structures on this block, the building is an integral part of the character of late nineteenth and early twentieth century commercial buildings that developed around the Capitol Square.

Madison Landmark Designation: April 22, 2008
Landmark Nomination Form


#178: University of Wisconsin Field House
1450 Monroe Street
1929-1930
Architect: Arthur Peabody, with staff William F. Stevens and John Knudsen

The University Field House was expertly designed in the Renaissance Revival style by the Staff of the State Architect’s office and was intended to provide both physical training facilities for the UW student body as well as a place where sporting events could take place. Its design is an excellent example of the numerous Renaissance Revival style buildings that Peabody developed for the UW Campus. The Field House is one of the last buildings in Madison to be faced with Madison sandstone. As the local quarries were almost depleted by the time the Field House was built, Peabody was forced to use rubble stone rather than dressed stone. However, the end result was very handsome and contrasted beautifully with the decorative accents of dressed stone.

The Field House was designed to replace the UW Stock Pavilion as the principle center for the UW’s large scale cultural events. Bands, orchestras, graduations and popular entertainers have all taken place within the Field House. The University Basketball team, playing their games in the Armory and gymnasium since 1892, was quickly outgrowing the space and discussions about building a new field house became a priority for Athletic Director George Little. Following the success of the football team and the growing popularity of events in Camp Randall Stadium, the UW Regents decided to build the new Field House adjacent to Camp Randall. As both a University and community gathering place and as a symbol of the University athletics, the Field House has historically played an important part in the life of both the University and the City of Madison.

Madison Landmark Designation: May 19, 2009
National Register of Historic Places: 1998
Landmark Nomination Form