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Twenty workshops were offered on Saturday, October 13. You can view the keynote and four workshops that were taped.

Conference at a Glance

8-9am | Registration, coffee chats, resource organization displays

9-10:30am | Mayor Soglin's Welcome Address / Fred Kent's Keynote Address (President, Project for Public Spaces)

10:45-11:45am | Workshops

12-12:45pm | Lunch

1-2pm | Workshops

2:15-3:15pm | Workshops

3:30-4:30pm | Workshops

4:30-5:30pm | Conference Closing and Reception (Monona Terrace)

8-9am: REGISTRATION

Registration, Coffee Chat and Organization Displays - Register, get coffee and a snack, chat with fellow neighborhood leaders, and peruse displays of local organizations to learn how they can help you achieve your neighborhood goals.

9-10:30am: WELCOME & KEYNOTE

Mayor's Opening / Fred Kent, President of Project for Public Spaces Keynote Address

10:45-11:50am: WORKSHOPS

  1. PUBLIC PLACES MATTER
    Neighborhood Placemaking: Principles to Action

    Fred Kent, President of Project for Public Spaces, will discuss the concept of the Power of 10 in relation to Madison neighborhoods. At the core of this concept is the idea that any great place needs to offer at least 10 things to do or 10 reasons to be there. He will discuss how to move ideas into reality by using a place-based strategy. You will learn about "lighter, quicker, cheaper" tools for turning a vision into reality.

    Mayor Paul Soglin and Fred Kent, President, Project for Public Spaces, NY, NY | www.pps.org

  2. PARTNERING W/ CITY GOVERNMENT
    Development Review Process Status

    In Fall 2011, the Common Council adopted the Economic Development Committee's "Development Process Improvement Initiative Report" which identified ways to improve the development review process to make it more efficient, predictable and uniform while maintaining high development standards. This workshop will discuss the development review process, proposed changes, and what this means for neighborhood review of proposed development projects. A brief update on the new zoning code and map will also be covered. Regent Neighborhood Association will share a copy of its development protocol.

    Presenters: Brad Murphy, Director, Planning Division; John Schlaefer, Regent Neighborhood Association

  3. NEIGHBORHOOD SUSTAINABILITY
    Sustainability, Density & Good Neighborhoods: Accessory Dwelling Units & Infill Co-Housing That Works

    Lou Host-Jablonski and Sue Thering will present a slideshow of projects from around the world to illustrate two approaches to infill: "Green Co-Housing" and "Green Accessory Dwelling Units" (ADUs). This session will illustrate how these approaches can be affordable and attractive alternatives to infill in Madison's residential neighborhoods. This presentation will include a simple but holistic approach to the question of "How Green Is It?" that is useful when deliberating the trade-offs inherent in any community initiative and evaluating alternatives along a spectrum from "deep green" to "greenwashing."

    Presenters: Lou Host-Jablonski and Susan Thering, Design Coalition

  4. NEIGHBORHOOD LEADERSHIP
    What's Worked, What Can We Try?

    What are some best practices that make a neighborhood association function well over time? A panel of neighborhood association leaders will share their best practices and lessons learned. Come learn how to keep neighborhood residents informed and engaged over the long-term, and learn some techniques for building a broad base of neighborhood association members, including renters, young people, condo owners and homeowners.

    Presenters: Greg Hull, Spring Harbor Neighborhood Association President; Sheri Carter, Arbor Hills Neighborhood Association President

1-2pm: WORKSHOPS

  1. PUBLIC PLACES MATTER
    Neighborhood Placemaking: Principles to Action

    Fred Kent, President of Project for Public Spaces, will discuss the concept of the Power of 10 in relation to Madison neighborhoods. At the core of this concept is the idea that any great place needs to offer at least 10 things to do or 10 reasons to be there. He will discuss how to move ideas into reality by using a place-based strategy. You will learn about "lighter, quicker, cheaper" tools for turning a vision into reality.

    Mayor Paul Soglin and Fred Kent, President, Project for Public Spaces, NY, NY | www.pps.org
    (Repeated)

  2. PARTNERING W/ CITY GOVERNMENT
    The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Learn what the Urban Design Commission shares with a classic spaghetti western by the director Sergio Leone. The panel workshop will cover how the work of the Urban Design Commission interacts with neighborhood concerns about the design of proposed projects. How are projects improved? What are the relevant issues for a design discussion versus planning issues more appropriate to the Plan Commission or the Common Council. The panel will be moderated by Urban Design Commission Chair Dick Wagner.

  3. NEIGHBORHOOD SUSTAINABILITY
    Local Food Systems: Access, Destinations and Markets

    Community food system policies and programs deal with economic development, land use, public health and environmental issues. Learn what affects food potentially has on communities and hear some suggestions on how to assess needs related to the local food system. Hear how Madison's Meet and Eat and other food-centric neighborhood events have helped to make food accessible, and neighborhoods more livable.

    Mark Woulf, Alcohol and Food Policy Coordinator, City of Madison Mayor's Office

  4. NEIGHBORHOOD LEADERSHIP
    Come to Dinner: Building Community and Partnerships Across the Table

    A brilliant idea emerged amongst neighborhood leaders in Meadowood: generate grassroots ideas from neighbors and then bring together neighborhood associations, neighbors of all ages, cultures, and experiences, and outside groups to make it happen. Come hear how Meadowood has used Community Suppers to help organize, prioritize projects, and recruit members from the neighborhood. The panel will share about successful workgroups initiated from the annual community supper and how this effort has pulled in enthusiastic neighbors that might not necessarily want to attend formal neighborhood meetings.

    Members of Meadowood Community Supper Work Group: Lisa Veldran (President, Meadowood Neighborhood Association), Shirley Culp, Ray McKnight, Aislynn Miller, Leslie Stephany, Sherri Swartz, Sheray Wallace, Rose Mary Wise

2:15-3:15pm: WORKSHOPS

  1. PUBLIC PLACES MATTER
    Madison's Favorites

    Madison's neighborhoods have many wonderful places where residents can come together or spend time. It also has some that could be improved so that they become true assets to the neighborhood. A panel of local design professionals will share their thoughts on what it takes to make neighborhood-scale places successful or not. Prior to the conference, attendees were asked to send in photos of their most favorite and least favorite places in the city. Panelists will discuss some of these examples.

    Presenters: Dawn O'Kroley, Principal, Dorschner|Associates, Inc; Ken Saiki, Landscape Architect, Ken Saiki Design, Inc.; Bill Fruhling, Principal Planner, City of Madison Planning Division

  2. NEIGHBORHOOD PLACEMAKING
    Place Based Strategy: High Achieving, High Quality Neighborhoods

    Madison's Neighborhood Resource Teams are implementing a place-based approached in nine neighborhood areas. Public infrastructure and services, community leadership capacity, and engagement of multiple sectors in smaller, neighborhood blocks builds upon the strengths of the people and place in which they live. Innovative projects are emerging and residents are discovering their voice, their imagination, and their power.

    Presenters: Astra Iheukumere, Mayor's Office and Karl Van Lith, Organizational Development and Training

  3. PARTNERING W/ CITY GOVERNMENT
    Working with Elected Officials: They Can Be Your Best Allies

    Accomplishing your neighborhood goals and objectives requires that you work effectively with elected officials. This workshop will help you do just that through a discussion of the role of elected officials, tapping into staff or fiscal resources, and strategies for getting your issues addressed. As a neighborhood leader, this workshop will teach you how to work more effectively to get the job done!

    Presenters: Alder Shiva Bidar-Sielaff, District 5 and Alder Chris Schmidt, District 11 (Repeated)

  4. NEIGHBORHOOD SUSTAINABILITY
    Eco-Friendly, Green Projects in Neighborhoods

    Explore green projects that improve energy efficiency, material resources, water reuse and unique building energy solutions. This workshop will provide information on starting EnAct Teams, a neighbor-based team that focuses on making daily living more sustainable. Green Madison and the Water Utility will speak about existing programs, incentives and/or rebates, and ways neighborhoods can help promote sustainability, including tips from neighborhood leaders that have worked with the programs.

    Presenters: Paul Grimyser, Community Development Division, Kayla Baake, EnAct, Gail Gawenda, Water Utility

  5. NEIGHBORHOOD LEADERSHIP
    Cultural Diversity Training

    Madison is becoming increasingly more diverse. Neighborhood organization meetings, activities and events can be terrific gathering places for residents of all cultures and ethnicity. Learn how to become more skilled at bringing people of all backgrounds together by going through an abbreviated session of the City of Madison Police Department's Cultural Diversity training.

    Presenters: Kymtana Woodly and Jared Prado, Madison Police Department

3:30-4:30pm: WORKSHOPS

  1. PUBLIC PLACES MATTER
    3 Great Places

    Get ready for a fast paced workshop where 3 neighborhood leaders will flip through slides of their great places. Ever wonder how neighbors got together and made it all happen? Have an idea to share and want to know how to get it off the ground? Question and answer will follow the slideshow with a panel of neighborhood leaders who can help your group create its own great places.

    1. Making a Unique Park: Carpenter Ridgeway Park Labyrinth, Bat Houses, Walking Path, Mighty Oaks Preservation, Sid Boyum Sculpture Garden, and Little Free Library bring people out for quiet contemplation and active recreation.

      Presenter: Randy Glysch, Carpenter-Ridgeway Neighborhood Association President

    2. More than a Community Garden! Quann Community Garden with its Thatched Hut, Edible Fence, Special Events and Workshops and the adjacent Jess Bullen Memorial Garden and Orchard make for an engaging place where neighbors can learn how to become a better gardener, thatch a roof, quietly meditate, pick and eat tasty fruit, and gather for community events and activities.

      Presenter: Cheryl DeWelt, Capitol View Heights Neighborhood Association

    3. Schools as Places: Hawthorne School, Playground, Sculpture Kiosk and Little Free Library bring kids as well as adults together to play, attend special events and learn about upcoming fun and educational opportunities at the school and in the neighborhood.

      Presenter: Julie Olsen, Hawthorne Elementary School Art Teacher

  2. NEIGHBORHOOD PLACEMAKING
    Make Music Madison: An Idea for June 21, 2013

    Please join us in creating the first Make Music Madison. Next year, on June 21, 2013, Madison will join New York, Denver, L.A., Paris, and 460 other cities around the world as they open their neighborhoods in a global celebration of music on the first day of summer. From the morning to evening, musicians of all ages, creeds, and musical persuasions perform on streets, sidewalks, stoops, parks and gardens. Imagine a cluster of public spaces in your neighborhood hosting local talent from high school jazz ensembles and local garage bands, to the UW Opera performance student, or the accomplished musician next door, all making music in the hub of your neighborhood. Come to hear about how you can make this happen in 2013. No instruments needed at the workshop!

    Karin Wolf, City of Madison Arts Program Administrator

  3. PARTNERING W/ CITY GOVERNMENT
    Working with Elected Officials: They Can Be Your Best Allies

    Accomplishing your neighborhood goals and objectives requires that you work effectively with elected officials. This workshop will help you do just that through a discussion of the role of elected officials, tapping into staff or fiscal resources, and strategies for getting your issues addressed. As a neighborhood leader, this workshop will teach you how to work more effectively to get the job done!

    Presenters: Alder Shiva Bidar-Sielaff, District 5 and Alder Chris Schmidt, District 11 (Repeated)

  4. NEIGHBORHOOD SUSTAINABILITY
    Getting Around

    Rising gasoline prices, increasing rate of obesity, and climate change are reasons that walking and walkable cities are essential to neighborhoods. This workshop will cover how to access and promote safe walking and biking in your neighborhood. Find out!

    Presenters: David Dryer, City Traffic Engineer and Aaron Crandall, Ped/Bike/Motor Vehicle Commission

  5. NEIGHBORHOOD LEADERSHIP
    Creating Safer Public Places

    Great public places offer aesthetically pleasing environments with engaging activities and events. People are attracted to these places, making them safer and more inviting. Learn how to work more effectively with Madison Park’s staff and Madison Police officers to make your neighborhood parks, public squares, greenways, and other public places safer and more inviting.

    Presenters: Frank Chandler, Madison Police Department and Josh Schmitt, Madison Parks Division

4:30-5:30pm: Closing and Reception

Informal Reception (at the Monona Terrace) - Gather with other neighborhood leaders for refreshments, relaxation and conversation about what you learned and how you will apply it in your neighborhood. Cash Bar.