Proposed 2017-18 Fee Increase

posted September 27, 2016 10:24 AM

Dane County, City of Madison, Middleton, and Sun Prairie are proposing a fee increase for the 2017 and 2018 Lake Access Permit and Dog Park Permit.

The Board of Park Commissioner will discuss and vote on these items at their next meeting on October 5, 2016 at the Warner Park Community Recreation Center at 6:30pm.

  • Increase in the annual Dog Park Permit fee over a two-year period:
    2017 proposed $2 increase to $32/annually; 2018 proposed $3 increase to $35/annually
     
  • Increase in the Lake Access Permit fee over a two-year period:
    2017 Resident proposed $2 increase to $37/annually; 2018 Resident proposed $3 increase to $40/annually.
    2017 Non-Resident proposed $2 increase to $47/annually; 2018 Non-Resident $3 proposed increase to $50/annually

FIELDS, OPEN OR CLOSED?

posted August 10, 2016 11:16 AM

The best and ONLY way to know if a park field is open for play is to call the Rainout Line (608)267-8787. Weekdays the line will be updated by 2:00pm, weekends and holidays the line will be updated by 9:00am. The line will be updated if fields are questionable, if no update by the times listed, fields are open for play. Fields that are closed for maintenance are listed on the website and NOT listed on the rainout line.

What are these spots on my tree's leaves?

posted August 18, 2016 11:28 AM

This is called "tar spot" and is common on maples, boxelders and other local trees.  Initially the spots are small and yellowish and may remain relatively small or may enlarge in the growing season. As the tar spot progresses, the center may become raised and turn black. This is a non-threatening fungus.

Does the tar spot kill or damage my tree?
For most trees, tar spot is not a serious disease and is primarily cosmetic and will not kill the tree.

What should I do if my tree is infected?
You can reduce or even eliminate tar spot by simply removing in the autumn the fallen, infected leaves from around the base of the tree. These leaves can be used as compost or burned (where permitted). Treatment is rarely, if ever warranted. You may further consult with a county UW-Extension horticultural professional.

Photo Courtesy of flickr: greenhem

 

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